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Testing the Sequence Stratigraphy Model: Response Of Fusulinacean Fauna to Sea-Level Fluctuations (Examples From Pennsylvanian and Cisuralian of the Pricaspian–Southern Urals Region)

By
Vladimir I. Davydov
Vladimir I. Davydov
Permian Research Institute, Boise State University, Department of Geosciences, 1910 University Drive, Boise, Idaho 83725, U.S.A.
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Tamra A. Schiappa
Tamra A. Schiappa
Permian Research Institute, Boise State University, Department of Geosciences, 1910 University Drive, Boise, Idaho 83725, U.S.A.
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Walter S. Snyder
Walter S. Snyder
Permian Research Institute, Boise State University, Department of Geosciences, 1910 University Drive, Boise, Idaho 83725, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 2003

Abstract

The Pricaspian and southern Urals region is paleogeographically situated between the Boreal and Tethyan provinces and comprises taxa of both affinities. Both sedimentologic analyses and the graphic correlation (GC) technique was used to clarify the Pennsylvanian and Cisuralian sequence stratigraphic framework in the Pricaspian and southern Urals region. Fusulinacean zones utilized for the region are based on a well established evolutionary framework. The study of phylogenetic successions combined with GC were used to distinguish between locally controlled initial occurrences and speciation. In the Pricaspian and southern Urals region, sequence boundaries coincide with the bases of several fusulinacean zones. These eustatic events (i.e., sea-level lowstand) correspond with significant extinction in fusulinacean evolution. The base of the Asselian (i.e., the base of the Permian), the base of the Sakmarian, and some fusulinacean zones coincide with highstands. Therefore, fusulinacean speciation appears to be associated with both highstands and lowstands. Sea-level lowstands may have been very stressful for global fusulinacean assemblages and may have been a catalyst for both speciation and extinction. Highstands also may have created environmental opportunities and appear to be associated more closely with fusulinacean speciation than with extinction. Sequence boundaries located within fusulinacean zones perhaps reflect local tectonism or local climatic changes.

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SEPM Special Publication

Micropaleontologic Proxies for Sea-Level Change and Stratigraphic Discontinuities

Hilary Clement Olson
Hilary Clement Olson
Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, Texas 78759-8500, U.S.A.
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R. Mark Leckie
R. Mark Leckie
Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, 611 N. Pleasant St., Amherst Massachusetts 01003, U.S.A.
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
75
ISBN electronic:
9781565762121
Publication date:
January 01, 2003

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