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Book Chapter

Sedimentation Processes and Asymmetric Development of the Godavari Delta, India

By
K. Nageswara Rao
K. Nageswara Rao
Department of Geo-Engineering, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 003, India, e-mail: nrkakani@yahoo.com
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N. Sadakata
N. Sadakata
Department of Geography, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8513, Japan , e-mail: sadakata@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp
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B. Hema Malini
B. Hema Malini
Department of Geography, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 003, India , e-mail: bhmalini@yahoo.com
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K. Takayasu
K. Takayasu
Research Center for Coastal Lagoon Environments, Shimane University, Matsue, 690-8504, Japan , e-mail: takayasu@soc.shimane-u.ac.jp
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Published:
January 01, 2005

Abstract:

The Godavari delta, on the east coast of India, is prograding into a microtidal and low to moderate wave environment, fed by a highly variable water discharge in a monsoon-driven hydrographic regime. Extensive strandplains that prograded 30 to 35 km across the continental shelf during the Middle to Late Holocene characterize the overall arcuate seaward bulge of the delta. At present, the delta has two lobes: the Gautami in the northeastern part and the Vasishta in the southwestern part, which have been active during the past one thousand years. Although the bigger size of the Gautami lobe with extensive mangrove swamps apparently indicates a larger riverine influence, both lobes, in fact, exhibit strong wave-influenced morphologies. As revealed by a series of historical maps, pronounced growth of spits characterizes the northern Gautami lobe. The 21-km-long Kakinada spit, which is prominent among all such sand bodies, had even deflected the Gautami distributary course in the initial stages of its growth under the influence of a strong northeastward longshore drift. Analysis of multi-date satellite images shows that spits are growing at the updrift sides of the mouths of the two terminal branches of Gautami, whereas erosion is dominant on their downdrift sides. On the downdrift side of the Vasishta mouth, development of mouth bars is followed by their emergence as barrier islands that migrate landward, and subsequent infilling of the backbarrier bays by riverine discharge, typical for wave-influenced asymmetric deltas. The nature of coastal landforms and sedimentation processes indicate prevalence of a northeastward drift at the Gautami lobe and a southwestward drift at the Vasishta lobe.

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Contents

SEPM Special Publication

River Deltas–Concepts, Models, and Examples

Liviu Giosan
Liviu Giosan
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Janok P. Bhattacharya
Janok P. Bhattacharya
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
83
ISBN electronic:
9781565762190
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

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