Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Sand-Rich Lithosomes of the Holocene Mississippi River Delta Plain

By
Mark Kulp
Mark Kulp
University of New Orleans, Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148, U.S.A., e-mail: mkulp@uno.edu
Search for other works by this author on:
Duncan Fitzgerald
Duncan Fitzgerald
Department Of Earth Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, U.S.A., e-mail: dunc@bu.edu
Search for other works by this author on:
Shea Penland
Shea Penland
University of New Orleans, Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148, U.S.A., e-mail: spenland@uno.edu
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2005

Abstract

The recognition by earlier researchers of progradational and retrogradational depositional packages in the stratigraphy of the Holocene Mississippi River delta plain resulted in the development of the “delta cycle model”, a conceptual process-response model to explain the genesis and distribution of stacked, laterallyoffset depocenters, and consequently the formation of Mississippi River deltaic- plain headlands. Historically, delta lobes of the Mississippi River delta system have been treated as river-dominated depocenters and sand- rich lithosomes in the headlands an outcome of progradation, and deposition in distributary networks as levee, distributary-mouth-bar, and delta-front sands. However, analysis of headlands along the south-central delta plain reveals, at least locally, sandy coastal lithosomes containing regressive beach ridges that built seaward on the updrift sides of prograding distributaries. Marine reworking of updrift abandoned distributaries and earlier-formed headlands provided a readily available and nearby source of the beach-ridge sand that was captured by youngerprogradational distibutaries. Consequently, the headlands are not simple regressive shorelines solely recording one phase or multiple phases of river-dominated progradation, but rather a facies mosaic containing many environments such as wave- dominated regressive beach-ridge plains and barrier complexes created during subsequent headland transgression. Most of the sand along the south-central shorelines exists in buried beach-ridge plains and the modern barrier-island systems. Understanding the distribution of sand-rich lithosomes in the shallow stratigraphy has important implications for both stratigraphic models of deltas and some coastal Louisiana restoration efforts. Sandy sediment is currently being sought for shoreline renourishment projects, and information regarding subsidence patterns is vital to predicting locations of future shoreline erosion and wetland loss. Because sandy lithosomes are less prone to compaction than the dominantly fine-grained facies of regressive fluvial deposition, composite headlands, constructed by fluvial and marine depositional processes, may be less susceptible to compaction following abandonment.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

SEPM Special Publication

River Deltas–Concepts, Models, and Examples

Liviu Giosan
Liviu Giosan
Search for other works by this author on:
Janok P. Bhattacharya
Janok P. Bhattacharya
Search for other works by this author on:
SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
83
ISBN electronic:
9781565762190
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal