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Organodiagenetic Dolomite on a Deep Subtidal Shelf, Fort Payne Formation (Mississippian), Tennessee, U.S.A

By
David N. Lumsden
David N. Lumsden
Department Of Earth Sciences, The University Of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152, U.S.A., e-mail: dlumsden@memphis.edu
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Published:
January 01, 2003

Abstract

This Study Analyzed Dolomite In The Lower Mississippian Fort Payne Formation And Compared It To Dolomite In Similar Deposits In Order To Substantiate Its Organodiagenetic Origin. The Fort Payne Formation In Tennessee Is ADolomitic Porcelaneous Chert That Was Deposited During Transgression Onto A Deep Subtidal Shelf. The dolomite occurs as 10-50 mm euhedral, commonly zoned rhombs enclosed in a very fine-grained spiculiferous chert. The dolomiteis extremely calcian (modes at 55% and 59% Ca), contains up to 1% iron, and has a δ13C mode at+2%o,δ18O modes at +1%o and -2%o, and a manganese partitioning ratio of 5 to 10. Three dolomite fabric types are present: Type 1, which occurs both as isolated 10-20 mm rhombs enclosed by chert and as corescontained in Type 2 dolomite; Type 2, with rhombs that are typically 30-50 mm on edge with luminescent rims thatenclose a nonluminescent core; and Type 3, volumetrically minor, ferroan, with 100-200 mm crystals that line vugs and fractures. In contrast to findings in previous studies the conclusion here is that Type 1 dolomite formed during organodiagenesis, syndepositionally, as a primary precipitate, and before chert formation. Type 2 dolomite precipitated as overgrowths on Type 1 cores, using Mg largely from ambient seawater supplemented by limited amounts from opal diagenesis. Type 3 dolomite formed after lithification. When one compares data from the Fort Payne with findings for lithologically similar coeval units, deep marine deposits of the modern ocean basins, deep-shelf deposits off California, the Monterey Formation, and deposits of the Great Australian Bight, it is apparent that Fort Payne dolomite largely formed by organodiagenesis in a deep-shelf marine setting.

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SEPM Special Publication

Permo-Carboniferous Carbonate Platforms and Reefs

Wayne M. Ahr
Wayne M. Ahr
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3115, U.S.A.
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Paul M. (Mitch) Harris
Paul M. (Mitch) Harris
ChevronTexaco E&P Technology Company, 6001 Bollinger Canyon Road, San Ramon, California 94583-0746, U.S.A.
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William A. Morgan
William A. Morgan
ConocoPhillips, Inc., P.O. Box 2197, Houston, Texas 77252-2197, U.S.A.
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Ian D. Somerville
Ian D. Somerville
Department of Geology, University College - Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
78
ISBN electronic:
9781565763340
Publication date:
January 01, 2003

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