Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

The Tengiz Oil Field in the Pre-Caspian Basin of Kazakhstan (Former USSR)-Supergiant of the 1980s

By
Nicolai N. Lisovsky
Nicolai N. Lisovsky
USSR Ministry of Oil and Gas Industry Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
Georgii N. Gogonenkov
Georgii N. Gogonenkov
Central Geophysical Expedition (CGE), USSR Ministry of Oil and Gas Industry Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
Yuri A. Petzoukha
Yuri A. Petzoukha
Institute of the Geology and Development of Combustible Fuels (IGIRGI), USSR Ministry of Oil and Gas Industry, and USSR Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1992

Abstract

Oil and gas explorationists have amassed more than a century of experience, and their efforts have led to the discovery of tens of thousands of fields in oil and gas basins throughout the world. However, the number of giants and supergiants among these fields has been extremely small.

The discovery of a supergiant is always a noteworthy event in petroleum geology. It provides a strong impetus not only to the development of the oil-producing district, but also to the economic development of the region and the country.

The Soviet Union is a major producer of hydrocarbons and for many decades has been conducting intensive oil and gas prospecting and exploration. The geographic focus of exploration and the concentration of production have changed significantly over this period (Figure 1). For instance, up until World War II, the Caucasus, chiefly the region around Baku, was the primary producing region. Then several fields, among them the Romashkino supergiant, were discovered in the area between the Volga River and the Urals.

Thanks to advances in exploration, the production level in the Volga-Urals oil and gas province rose to 1.7 billion bbl (240 million MT) per year. The next major advance in the establishment of hydrocarbon reserves occurred after the discovery of the very large oil and gas province in western Siberia, where numerous fields were identified, among them the Samotlor oil supergiant and the Urengoi gas supergiant. With this discovery, annual output in the Soviet Union rose to 4.2 billion bbl (600 million MT) of petroleum and 28 tcf (800 billion m3) of gas.

The pre-Caspian depression long ago attracted the attention of petroleum geologists. Early exploration was conducted here for relatively shallow reservoirs within reach of what was then state-of-the-art technology. The improvement of the technical level of exploration—above all, the conversion to multiple-fold coverage and digital processing of seismic data—and the drilling of wells to depths of 5 to 6 km made it possible to explore the lower portion of the sedimentary section and to identify several very large gas and condensate fields (Astrakhan, Orenburg, Karachaganak, and others) along the margin of the basin.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Memoir

Giant Oil and Gas Fields of the Decade 1978-1988

Michel T. Halbouty
Michel T. Halbouty
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
54
ISBN electronic:
9781629811086
Publication date:
January 01, 1992

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal