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Book Chapter

The Reservoir Geology and Geophysics of the Hibernia Field, Offshore Newfoundland

By
T. J. Hurley
T. J. Hurley
Mobil Oil Canada, Ltd. Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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R.D. Kreisa
R.D. Kreisa
Mobil Oil Canada, Ltd. Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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G. G. Taylor
G. G. Taylor
Mobil Oil Canada, Ltd. Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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W. R. L. Yates
W. R. L. Yates
Mobil Oil Canada, Ltd. Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Published:
January 01, 1992

ABSTRACT

The Hibernia field is located 315 km (195 mi) offshore and east-southeast of St. John's, Newfoundland. The field was discovered in 1979 and contains an estimated 83 million m3 (525 million bbl) of recoverable oil. Preproduction investment, which includes the construction of a concrete gravity base structure, is approximately $5 billion (Canadian). Production is scheduled to commence in 1996; the expected plateau production rate is 17,480 m3 per day (110,000 BOPD). To date, there is no hydrocarbon production from offshore eastern Canada.

Hibernia is located in the northwestern sector of the Jeanne d'Arc rift basin. The trap is a complexly faulted anticline created by rollover into the basin-bounding Murre fault. The integrated geological and geophysical interpretation of the field is based on the results of ten wells and 465 km2 (180 mi2) of three-dimensional seismic data.

Berriasian- to Valanginian-aged Hibernia sandstones are the primary reservoirs occurring at an average drill depth of 3720 m (12, 200 ft). Sedimentological interpretation of core indicates that the principal reservoirs were deposited as high-bed load distributary channels in a fluvially dominated deltaic complex. Average porosity is 16%; permeability ranges up to 10 darcys. Reservoir sands are interpreted as being elongated and relatively continuous in a southwest-northeast direction. Downdip water injection will be implemented to maximize recovery.

Barremian- to Albian-aged Ben Nevis/Avalon sandstones are the secondary reservoirs and occur at an average drill depth of 2345 m (7700 ft). Core studies indicate deposition within strand plain, transgressive shoreface, and offshore shallow marine environmerits. The extent of lateral continuity is uncertain due to a combination of thin bed stratigraphy, structural complexity, zones of bioturbation, and calcite cementation.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

Giant Oil and Gas Fields of the Decade 1978-1988

Michel T. Halbouty
Michel T. Halbouty
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
54
ISBN electronic:
9781629811086
Publication date:
January 01, 1992

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