Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Carbonates Versus Siliciclastics in Sequence Stratigraphy

Published:
January 01, 1992

Abstract

In chapter 4 we concluded that sea level fluctuations are but one of several ways to generate sequences and systems tracts. This claim is based on a sedimentologic evaluation of sequence anatomy. Where sea level does exert the dominant control on sequence stratigraphy, sedimentology must be called upon again, this time to assess the differences of the sea-level records of depositional systems. Siliciclastics and carbonates are the two most prominent examples that come to mind, but evaporites, too, have their specific ways of recording sea level. Depositional systems resemble newspapers that all report on the events of the day, but each with different editorial bias. It behooves the reader to learn about the editorial bias of his paper. Similarly, the geologist ought to know about the bias of depositional systems in recording changes of sea level (and other environmental factors). Below, we discuss some peculiarities of carbonates vis a vis siliciclastics.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Continuing Education Course Notes Series

Sedimentology and Sequence Stratigraphy of Reefs and Carbonate Platforms: A Short Course

Wolfgang Schlager
Wolfgang Schlager
Free University, Amsterdam
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
34
ISBN electronic:
9781629811062
Publication date:
January 01, 1992

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal