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Facies Architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake Area, Oklahoma: Implications for Reservoir Characterization of the Subsurface Bartlesville Sandstone

By
Liangmiao “Scott” Ye
Liangmiao “Scott” Ye
ARCO EPTPlano, Texas, U.S.A.
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Dennis Kerr
Dennis Kerr
Smedvig Technologies, Inc.Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
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Kexian Yang
Kexian Yang
Smedvig Technologies, Inc.Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 1999

Abstract

Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide useful insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville sandstone in Glenn Pool field. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying and photomosaics. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data.

Reservoir-scale facies architecture is reconstructed in four hierarchical lev-els: multistory discrete genetic intervals, individual discrete genetic interval, facies within a discrete genetic interval, and subfacies of the meandering channel-fill facies. From the Eufaula Lake to Glenn Pool field areas, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone, taken as a whole, represents an incised valley fill above a type-1 sequence boundary. It comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided channel-fill-dominated interval, regarded as representing the lowstand systems tract, and an upper meandering channel-fill-dominated interval, regarded as the transgressive systems tract.

Braided channel-fill facies are typically 30-80 ft (9-24 m) thick and are laterally persistent, filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular, with local relief of 50 ft (15 m). The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400 ft (30-122 m) wide, 5-15 ft (1-4 m) thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium to coarsegrained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile.

Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100-150 ft (30-45 m) thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals. Meandering channel-fill facies successions include basal trough cross-stratified medium-grained sandstones, medial low-angle-stratified fine-grained sandstones with numerous mudstone drapes, and an upper mudstone. Well log profile is typically a serrated bell shape. Splay facies is up to 20 ft (6 m) thick, and consists of ripple stratified and lesser trough cross-stratified, medium-grained sandstones separated by laterally persistent thin mudstones. Floodplain mudstones laterally and vertically segment, with the exception of very limited areas, channel-fill and splay sandstones into reservoir compartments.

Porosity and permeability values are mostly influenced by the discrete genetic interval (DGI) level. Lower DGIs, dominated by braided channel-fill facies, have the highest porosity and permeability, and show very weak permeability anisotropy. The upper DGIs, dominated by meandering channel-fill and splay facies, have progressively lower porosity and permeability vertically upward through the DGIs. Meandering channel-fill facies, particularly the middle channel-fill subfacies, have strongly developed permeability anisotropy.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

Reservoir Characterization—Recent Advances

Richard A. Schatzinger
Richard A. Schatzinger
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John F. Jordan
John F. Jordan
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
71
ISBN electronic:
9781629810720
Publication date:
January 01, 1999

GeoRef

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