Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

An Integrated Approach to Characterization and Modeling of Deep-water Reservoirs, Diana Field, Western Gulf of Mexico

By
Morgan D. Sullivan
Morgan D. Sullivan
ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
J. Lincoln Foreman
J. Lincoln Foreman
ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
David C. Jennette
David C. Jennette
ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
David Stern
David Stern
ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Gerrick N. Jensen
Gerrick N. Jensen
ExxonMobil Exploration Company, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Frank J. Goulding
Frank J. Goulding
ExxonMobil Exploration Company, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2004

ABSTRACT

The situation presented at the Diana field in the western Gulf of Mexico is a common one in exploration and early development: a hydrocarbon reservoir expressed by a single-cycle seismic event and limited appraisal wells spaced thousands of feet apart. There is excellent core coverage that enables close calibration of seismic and well data. Integration and analysis of the data suggest a relatively channelized reservoir in an updip position, becoming more sheetlike and layered downdip. This subsurface data, however, does not have the resolution to provide the dimensional and architectural information required to populate an object-based three-dimensional geologic model for more accurate flow simulation and well-performance prediction. To solve these uncertainties, deep-water outcrop analog data from the Lower Permian Skoorsteenberg Formation in the Tanqua Karoo Basin, South Africa, and the Upper Carboniferous Ross Formation in the Clare Basin, western Ireland, were integrated with the seismic and well data from the Diana field. Bed-scale reservoir architectures were quantified with photomosaics and by correlation of closely spaced measured sections. Bed continuity and connectivity data, along with vertical and lateral facies variability information, also were collected, as these factors ultimately control the reservoir behavior. From these measurements, a spectrum of channel dimensions and shapes were compiled to condition the modeled objects. These dimensions were compared to Diana specific seismic and well data and adjusted accordingly. The advantage of the resulting Diana geologic model is that it incorporates geologic interpretation, honors all available information, and models the reservoir as discrete objects with specific dimensions, facies juxtaposition, and connectivity. This study provides the framework for optimal placement of wells to maximize the architectural and facies controls on reservoir performance.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Memoir

Integration of Outcrop and Modern Analogs in Reservoir Modeling

G. Michael Grammer
G. Michael Grammer
Search for other works by this author on:
Paul M. “Mitch” Harris
Paul M. “Mitch” Harris
Search for other works by this author on:
Gregor P. Eberli
Gregor P. Eberli
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
ISBN electronic:
9781629810478
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal