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Integration of Outcrop and Modern Analogs in Reservoir Modeling: Overview with Examples from the Bahamas

By
G. Michael Grammer
G. Michael Grammer
Western Michigan University, Department of Geosciences, Kalamazoo, Michigan, U.S.A.
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Paul M. “Mitch” Harris
Paul M. “Mitch” Harris
ChevronTexaco, Energy Technology Company, San Ramon, California, U.S.A.
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Gregor P. Eberli
Gregor P. Eberli
University of Miami, Comparative Sedimentology Laboratory, Miami, Florida, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Development of a geologically constrained reservoir model and subsequent upscaling of the model for reservoir simulation depends on critical input parameters defining both the geometrical attributes and distribution of the targeted reservoir facies. To accurately characterize the potential reservoir, one must address the geologically defined variability in the system. Gross differences in sedimentary facies, as well as more local variations in aspects such as grain size/type, grain sorting, sedimentary structures, and diagenetic overprint, may all influence the internal makeup and geometry of sedimentary deposits and, thus, the heterogeneity of potential reservoirs. Integration of geologically based elements is, therefore, a fundamental step in the characterization of the probable lateral and vertical distribution and variability of reservoir facies in the subsurface. Such a geologically based model not only increases our understanding of reservoir heterogeneity but also provides the foundation for which the rest of the reservoir models and, ultimately, simulation models can be built.

In the last several years, we have seen the development of high-resolution sequence and cycle stratigraphy, and with it, the advent of a refined mode of interpretation for depositional systems. Using a sequence-stratigraphic approach, sedimentary systems are analyzed dynamically through time, rather than as a single time slice, as was done previously with static depositional or facies models. These dynamic conceptual models offer better predictability of the distribution of potential reservoir facies and their reservoir quality, especially when combined with recent advances in our understanding of the detailed internal architecture and diagenesis of dep-ositional systems.

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AAPG Memoir

Integration of Outcrop and Modern Analogs in Reservoir Modeling

G. Michael Grammer
G. Michael Grammer
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Paul M. “Mitch” Harris
Paul M. “Mitch” Harris
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Gregor P. Eberli
Gregor P. Eberli
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
ISBN electronic:
9781629810478
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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