Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Subduction in the Remnant Carpathian Flysch Basin

By
M. Nemčok
M. Nemčok
Energy and Geoscience Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
L. Pospíšil
L. Pospíšil
Geoinform Consultants, Brno, Czech Republic
Search for other works by this author on:
I. Hrušecký
I. Hrušecký
Geological Survey of Slovak Republic, Bratislava, Slovakia
Search for other works by this author on:
T. Zsíros
T. Zsíros
Seismological Observatory, Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Science, Budapest, Hungary
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2006

Abstract

This chapter serves as an overview of facts on the Carpathian–Pannonian Tertiary development. It discusses about 35 geophysical-geological data layers of the database presented in the entire chapter, correlates them briefly, and notes the main results of such a multidisciplinary synthesis. This synthesis indicates that the remnant Carpathian Flysch Basin (rCFB) was affected by subduction since the early Miocene. Areas to the west and east of the rCFB were undergoing continent-continent collisions at the same time. From the late Oligocene to middle Miocene, crustal wedges moving laterally from these collisions became parts of the Carpathian–Pannonian slab overriding the rCFB. This basin underwent passive subduction characterized by passive sinking of the oceanic slab under its body forces. Subduction setting was characterized by a steep dip of the subducting slab, strong hinterland extension, extensive areal magmatism in the hinterland, and asthenospheric upwelling in the hinterland. The oceanic plate underlying the rCFB subducted southwestward and westward. The subduction rollback of the subducting slab under the advancing Carpathian orogen, the oblique closure of the rCFB, and the progressive change of subduction to collision from west to east along the Carpathian arc drove a scissorlike break-off of the subducting oceanic slab along the Carpathians. The break-off was driven by the weight of the subducting oceanic slab and the buoyancy of the attached continental slab. The break-off ran eastward along the whole Carpathian arc, from the early Miocene to its present position in the bend between the Eastern and Southern Carpathians.

Copyright ©2006. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. DOI:10.1306/985628M843083

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Memoir

The Carpathians and Their Foreland: Geology and Hydrocarbon Resources

Jan Golonka
Jan Golonka
Search for other works by this author on:
Frank J. Picha
Frank J. Picha
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
84
ISBN electronic:
9781629810379
Publication date:
January 01, 2006

GeoRef

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

View Article Abstract & Purchase Options

For full access to this pdf, sign in to an existing account, or purchase an annual subscription.

Subscribe Now