Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Deep-water Siliciclastic Outcrops from the Brushy Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, West Texas: Summary and Locations

By
Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

Slope to basin-floor-fan outcrops of the Brushy Canyon and cherry Canyon Formations are well exposed in West Texas (Figure 1) along the western edge of the Guadalupe and Delaware Mountains. The formations, which consist of sandstones, siltstones, and minor amounts of shales, were deposited during the Permian (Guadalupian) in an inland sea (Delaware basin) that was surrounded by a shallow-water carbonate ramp. The ramp later evolved into a reef-bounded shelf. The ramp is characterized by thick, cyclic, highstand carbonares and thin sandstones (deposited during sea level fall) of the San Andres and Grayberg Formations. The basin is dominated by thick, lowstand sandstones and siltstones of the Brushy Canyon and cherry Canyon Formations. The siliciclastics were deposited during a third-order lowstand cycle of approximately 2 m.y. The Brushy Canyon Formation has been divided into Lower, Middle, and Upper Members that correspond to fourth-order cycles, which are further subdivided into fifth-order cycles (Gardner and Borer, 2000). Fine-grained siltstones and minor shales with some organic matter are the highstand deposits separating the sandstone-rich lowstand deposits. Base-level fall resulted in 1) minor karstification and bypass on the ramp, 2) slumping, bypass, and then backfill on the slope, with mostly siltstones present between isolated canyons/channels, and 3) channelized and interchannel deposits near the toe of slope and upper fan that changed downdip to more mounded sheet deposits on the basin floor. It is evident that the slope was primarily a site of sediment bypass with only local sand accumulations, whereas the basin was the site of major deposition with some bypass in the channels. Lower to Upper Brushy Canyon slope progradation also led to a change from more distal to more proximal deposits vertically within the Brushy Canyon (Figure 2).

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
Search for other works by this author on:
Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
Search for other works by this author on:
Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
Search for other works by this author on:
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal