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Architecture and Lithofacies of the Miocene Capistrano Formation, San Clemente State Beach, California, USA

By
K. M Campion
K. M Campion
1
ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas, USA
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A. R. Sprague
A. R. Sprague
1
ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas, USA
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M. D. Sullivan
M. D. Sullivan
2
chevron Company, Houston, Texas, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

Exposures of the Capistrano Formation at San Clemente, California, are part of a sand-dominated complex of channels that were deposited in a deep-water slope setting. This formation, which is at least 18 m (59 ft) thick and 1.2 km (0.7 mi) wide, is comprised of architectural elements that fit into a hierarchical framework. These include, from smallest to largest, stories (sub-channel elements bounded by erosion surfaces), individual channels, and channel complexes. Within the outcrop belt, three channel complexes are interpreted to be present based on channel-stacking arrangement, channel orientation, and lithofacies distribution within channels. These channel complexes are comprised of laterally amalgamated to aggradational channels. Within each complex, the channels exhibit a predictable, lateral change of lithofacies from channel-complex margin to axis. These complexes are on the order of 400-600 m (1300-1970 ft) wide and at least 20 m (66 ft) thick (true thickness is unknown because the base is not exposed, and the top has been eroded).

Complete channels are not preserved within the Capistrano because of erosion between channels. Remnants of individual channels exhibit a systematic change in sand fraction, facies preservation, and bed architecture from the margin to the axis of each channel fill. The most complete channel (channel 7) is about 20 m (66 ft) thick and 460 m (1510 ft) wide. Sub-channel elements within Capistrano channels are referred to as stories. Stories consist of bedsets bounded by erosion surfaces that exhibit 1—2 m (3.3 −6.6 ft) of relief and are confined within channels, which exhibit at least 15 m (49 ft) of erosion.

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
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Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
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Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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