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Slope-Channel Complex Fill and Overbank Architecture, Tinker Channel, Kirkgecit Formation, Turkey

By
Bryan T. Cronin
Bryan T. Cronin
1
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
5
Present address: Deep Marine, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
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Hasan Çelik
Hasan Çelik
2
Department of Geological Engineering, Engineering & Architecture Faculty, Bozok University, Yozgat, Turkey
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Andrew Hurst
Andrew Hurst
1
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
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Murat Gul
Murat Gul
3
Department of Geological Engineering, Mersin University, Mersin, Turkey
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Kemal Gürbüz
Kemal Gürbüz
4
Department of Geological Engineering, Cukurova University, Balcali, Adana, Turkey
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Adriano Mazzini
Adriano Mazzini
1
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
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Michael Overstolz
Michael Overstolz
1
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

The Tinker channel is exposed in a series of dip and strike sections to the east of Hasret Mountain, near Elazig, in eastern Turkey (Figure 1A). The exposures are part of the exhumed northern margin of the northeast-to-southwest-oriented Elazig Basin, which has almost continuous exposures for 75 km (46 mi) in the high eastern Anatolian badlands (Cronin et al., 2005). The outcrop allows study of a series of time-equivalent stratigraphic intervals through a clastic system that propagated from the elevated middle Eocene hinterlands and narrow shelves to the north, toward the deep basin axis to the south and east. The Kirkgecit Formation is interpreted as a predominantly low net-to-gross, deep-water, slope-environment succession, which has infilled a topographically irregular basin margin, created during basin formation in a rapidly subsiding back-arc setting. Incised and entrenched slope-channel complexes contain most of the coarser grained, deep-water clastic sediment within the Kirkgecit Formation. The Tinker channel (Cronin et al., 2000b) is one of a series of such channel-complex exposures that allow detailed examination of the fill and overbank stratigraphic architecture. The main Tinker channel exposures are to the east of Hasret Mountain, 15 km (9 mi) east of the city of Elazig. The channel is located 3 km (1.8 mi) downdip of the inferred contemporaneous slope break (Karadag, Figure IB). It is the most proximal channel of a series of four slope-channel complexes (Figure 1C) that occur within the same stratigraphic interval. The Tinker channel was documented by Cronin et al. (2000b) and the architecture and chronology of the enveloping deep-water slope succession by Cronin et al. (2000a).

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AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
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Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
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Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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