Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Evolution of Multiphase, Winged, Coarse-grained, Deep-water Canyons: Alikayasi Canyon, Turkey

By
Bryan T. Cronin
Bryan T. Cronin
1
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Kings College, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
6
Present address: Deep Marine, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Search for other works by this author on:
Kemal Gürbüz
Kemal Gürbüz
2
Department of Geological Engineering, Cukurova University, Balcali, Adana, Turkey
Search for other works by this author on:
Murat Gul
Murat Gul
3
Department of Geological Engineering, Mersin University, Mersin, Turkey
Search for other works by this author on:
Hasan Çelik
Hasan Çelik
4
Department of Geological Engineering, Engineering & Architecture Faculty, Bozok University, Yozgat, Turkey
Search for other works by this author on:
Andrew Hurst
Andrew Hurst
1
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Kings College, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Search for other works by this author on:
Gilbert Kelling
Gilbert Kelling
5
Department of Earth Sciences and Geography, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

The Alikayasi Canyon Member of the Tekir Formation occurs in a thick sequence of deep-water slope deposits on the northern margin and center of the lower-middle Miocene Maras foreland basin in eastern Turkey. The canyon was one of at least four major sediment-bypass systems that sourced from a narrow shelf otherwise occupied by thick, coeval carbonate reefs. What remains of the source hinterland indicates that thick fan deltas propagated directly into the heads of the deep-water canyons that characterize these bypass systems. The Alikayasi Canyon is exposed as an almost completely exhumed sediment body in an area of sparse vegetation, where the contemporaneous shelf margin is still largely intact, and it represents the youngest of these four systems. It forms a 7-km (4-mi)-long, up to 300-m (984-ft)-high, and up to 1-km (0.6-mi)-wide sediment body, dissected once by a river, which is now drowned by an artificial lake behind the Menzelet Dam. The exposure is complete apart from a 1.5 km (0.9 mi) section through its most proximal reaches, and a 2 km (1.2 mi) section in its most distal reaches where it feeds into a series of sandy lobes. The canyon fill is characterized by stratified conglomerates and pebbly sandstones in its lower part, stratified conglomerates and braid-plain-style conglomerates and pebbly sandstones in its middle part, and steeply dipping fan-delta conglomerate clinoforms in its upper part. The axial area of the canyon is dominated by these coarse-grained deposits, although locally remnants of intracanyon shales, in the form of floating rafts, shale blocks, and clasts,

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
Search for other works by this author on:
Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
Search for other works by this author on:
Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
Search for other works by this author on:
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal