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Introduction to Deep-water Deposits of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa

By
Arnold H Bouma
Arnold H Bouma
Texas A&M University
,
College Station, Texas, USA
Previously Louisiana State University
,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
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Anne M Delery
Anne M Delery
Anteon Corporation
,
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Previously Louisiana State University
,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
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Erik D Scott
Erik D Scott
Shell EP Europe
,
Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Previously Louisiana State University
,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

The southwestern part of the Karoo basin, South Africa is comprised of two mountain chains (Figures 1,2). The southern branch (Witteberg Swartberg Range) runs east-west, and the western branch (Cedarberg Range) is more or less north-south. Where the two meet is a northeast-trending syntaxis with two anticlinoria. This structural area encloses two foredeep areas, known as the Laingsburg subbasin and the Tanqua Karoo subbasin. The east-west running Laingsburg subbasin is a typical elongated foredeep. Later tectonic activities tilted this basin, with the result that the layers are close to vertical. Between the western branch and the anticlinoria is the location of the Tanqua Karoo subbasin. The outcrops of this basin now cover an area of 650 km2 (250 mi2). The basin is Permian age (Figure 3; Wickens and Bouma, 2000). Gradual sinking of the basin has resulted in a 7–8-km (4.36–5.0-mi)-thick package of younger deposits overlying the deep-water sediments. A later rebound eroded overburden, with the result that the Permian deep-water deposits became exposed. The outcropping area is about 34 km (21 mi) long and has no tectonic dip in the north-south direction. The visible width varies from 8 to 12 km (5–7.5 mi), and shows 1–3° tilt to the east. Lack of vegetation exposes large outcrops along the western and southern sides, as well as in the middle along the Gemsbok River (Figure 5). The outcrops make it possible to observe the depositional changes in the downslope direction. The subbasins formed during the Permian compressional collision

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
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Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
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Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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