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Coarse-grained Bar Forms in the Condor Channel Complex, Cerro Toro Formation at Lago Sarmiento, Chile

By
Ciarán J. O’Byrne
Ciarán J. O’Byrne
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Brad E. Prather
Brad E. Prather
Shell Exploration and Production, Houston, Texas, USA
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Carlos Pirmez
Carlos Pirmez
Shell Exploration and Production, Houston, Texas, USA
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Mark D. Barton
Mark D. Barton
Shell Exploration and Production, Houston, Texas, USA
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell Exploration and Production, Houston, Texas, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

The Condor channel complex, part of the Campanian Cerro Toro Formation (see overview by Fildani et al., chapter 32, this volume) forms part of an extensive outcrop belt exposed in the Pare Nacional Torres Del Paine in southern chile. The data presented here illustrate large, coarse-grained, barform elements that are interpreted as deposits within a deep-water channel complex. The photomosaics in Figures 1 and 2 are from the easternmost extent of a continuous but variably dip- and strike-oriented exposure, which is more than a kilometer (0.6 mi) long. It can be traced into the younger section of the Condor channel complex described in detail by Barton et al. (chapter 39, this volume).

The lowest exposed part of the cliff section in this eastern panel (Figure 2) contains slumps and thin-bedded channel fills in a low net-to-gross background with lags, collapsed margins, and heterolithic channel fills. These are interpreted as the product of through-going, large-volume, high-density flows interstratified with deposits of sporadic, low-density flows. The upper two-thirds of the cliff face comprises three distinct sand-rich intervals here termed channel story sets (CSS; see paper by O’Byrne et al., chapter 30, this volume, for further definition). The lower two have similar erosional channel features at their base that are filled with thin-bedded tail, lag, and slump deposits (Figure 2). This implies that each channel story set initially had an efficient erosion-and bypass-dominated phase prior to accumulation of dune and interdune/suspension deposits (Figure 3),

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
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Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
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Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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