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Stratigraphic Anatomy and Depositional History of a Mass-transport Complex, Isaac Formation, Windermere Supergroup, British Columbia, Canada

By
Joel Laurin
Joel Laurin
1
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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Kenny Wallace
Kenny Wallace
1
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
2
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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R. W. C. Arnott
R. W. C. Arnott
1
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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Ernesto Schwarz
Ernesto Schwarz
1
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

Sandwiched between Isaac channels 2 and 3 is a 130-m (426-ft)-thick mass-transport complex (MTC) composed mostly of very coarse debris-flow and slump/slide deposits. The succession can be traced laterally from Castle Creek South to Castle Creek North, a distance of at least 2.2 km (1.4 mi). The anomalous abundance of debris-flow and slump/slide deposits compared to super- and subjacent strata suggests a period of slope instability that interrupted otherwise gravitationally stable slope conditions. Additionally, the abrupt increase in the size of sediment particles, composed mostly of quartz, with lesser carbonate and carbonate-cemented clasts, suggests an important change in sediment provenance.

In Castle Creek North, the MTC is a tabular unit consisting of a 55-m (180-ft)-thick slide/slump overlain by a 16-m (53-ft)-thick, carbonate-clast-rich, debris-flow deposit. In the slide/slump unit, ductile and brittle deformation structures are common, and clasts consist of a diverse assemblage of low-total-organic-content mudstone and arkosic-sandstone blocks, some ranging up to a few tens of meters (>100 ft) long and several meters (few tens of ft) thick. The debris-flow deposit consists of dispersed quartz pebbles, carbonate-cemented mudstone and common shallow-water stromatolite and oolite fragments. In Castle Creek South, the MTC is a significantly more complicated melange comprising a number of erosively based units. Near the glacier in Castle Creek South, the succession is about 60 m (200 ft) thick and comprises a basal, coarse quartz-pebble-conglomerate that is overlain by a 20-m- (65-ft)-thick slide deposit. The slide deposit is capped by a 30-m (100-ft)-thick mudstone-rich, debris-flow deposit, commonly with dispersed,

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
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Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
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Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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