Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Stratigraphic and Depositional Architecture of a Slope Channel System: Isaac Channel 5, Castle Creek South, Isaac Formation, Windermere Supergroup, British Columbia, Canada

By
Ernesto Schwarz
Ernesto Schwarz
Search for other works by this author on:
R. W. C. Arnott
R. W. C. Arnott
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

A detailed architectural analysis was conducted on Isaac channel 5 in the Castle Creek area (east-central British Columbia, Canada, Figure 1). Isaac channel 5 developed within a Neoproterozoic slope turbidite system along the passive western margin of North America where debris flows and mass movements were common (see Arnott and Ross, chapter 22, this volume).

Isaac channel 5 crops out across a 3.5-km (2.1-mi)-long section oriented oblique to mean paleoflow (toward the northwest) and represents an enduring transport and depositional pathway that accumulated ~100 m (~330 ft) of mostly sand sediment (Figures 2, 3). It consists of three stacked, high net-to-gross channel-complex fills (each 8–30 m [25–100 ft] thick) that correspond to shorter term flow conduits (C1, C2, and C3; Figures 2, 3). channel complexes are multistory units that consist mainly of thick-bedded, Bouma Ta and Tab divisions, mudstone-clast breccia, and medium-bedded, dune cross-stratified sandstone. Granule conglomerate to medium-grained sandstone is the most common grain-size range. Five different channel-fill elements were identified within the channel complexes. Each consists of a different assemblage of facies, stratal patterns, and/or lateral dimensions, and unique reservoir characteristics (Figure 12). The development of channel-fill elements is linked to specific combinations of flow and sediment flux conditions that controlled aggradation and erosion within channels.

channel complexes are capped by siltstone-rich, thin-bedded units (T3 and T4; Figures 2, 3) that represent intervening episodes of overbank and levee sedimentation (local channel-complex deactivation). Additionally, debrite deposits (D1 and D2), which occur typically at the base of channels and channel complexes, are the result of

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
Search for other works by this author on:
Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
Search for other works by this author on:
Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
Search for other works by this author on:
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal