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Architecture of a Deep-water, Salt-withdrawal Minibasin, Donkey Bore Syncline, Australia

By
Tobias H. D. Payenberg
Tobias H. D. Payenberg
Australian School of Petroleum, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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Carmen B. E. Krapf
Carmen B. E. Krapf
Australian School of Petroleum, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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Simon C. Lang
Simon C. Lang
Australian School of Petroleum, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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Blaise Fernandes
Blaise Fernandes
Australian School of Petroleum, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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Mark R. W. Reilly
Mark R. W. Reilly
Australian School of Petroleum, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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Nathan Ceglar
Nathan Ceglar
Australian School of Petroleum, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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Khairul A. Mohamed Ibrahim
Khairul A. Mohamed Ibrahim
Australian School of Petroleum, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

The Cambrian Donkey Bore Syncline exposes a salt-withdrawal minibasin filled with more than 500 m (1640 ft) of clastic sediments in the northern part of the Flinders Ranges, South Australia. The minibasin formed in the Early Cambrian as the Adelaide geosyncline passive margin was inverted. Analysis of salt geometries within the Flinders Ranges suggests that the Delamerian orogeny may have commenced during the latest Proterozoic (Mark G. Rowan and Bruno C. Vendeville, personal communication, 2006). If true, movement of the Willouran-aged Callanna Group salt would have been enhanced by shortening-induced folding and diapir squeezing.

The doubly folded syncline exposes shallowly dipping sediments along its three limbs across an area of approximately 21 km2 (8 mi2) next to the Wirrealpa Diapir. The minibasin was situated on the upper slope, most likely below storm wave base. It was flanked to the south by a shallow-marine clastic depositional environment during deep-water sandstone (Bunkers Sandstone) deposition. Paleocurrent data within the basin as well as the axes of slumped sandstone beds indicate sediment input from the south. The main deep-water sediments of the Bunkers Sandstone are up to 350 m (1150 ft) thick. They have an overall net-to-gross of approximately 30% and form a transgressive package with each unit becoming successively less sand-rich.

Three classes of architectural elements, ranging in thickness from 50-90 m (164-295 ft), are present in outcrop. These include 1) sandstone-rich sheets with a net-to-gross of up to 70% (Unit A), 2) sandstone-rich thin beds with net-to-gross of up to 60%

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
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Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
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Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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