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Book Chapter

channel-levee Complexes of the Fossil Bluff Group, Antarctica

By
Peter J. Butterworth
Peter J. Butterworth
1BP, Cairo, Egypt
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David I. M. Macdonald
David I. M. Macdonald
2University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

During the Mesozoic, the present-day Antarctic Peninsula was the site of an active volcanic arc related to the eastwards subduc-tion of proto-Pacific oceanic crust. Alexander Island is the largest of the many islands that lie on the western (forearc) side of the Antarctic Peninsula. The island is comprised of a greenschist facies, accretionary prism complex (LeMay Group), unconformably overlain and faulted against the forearc sedimentary deposits of the Fossil Bluff Group.

The Fossil Bluff Group ranges in age from Middle Jurassic to latest Early Cretaceous and has a stratigraphic thickness of 7 km (4.4 mi). Aalonian-Tithonian clastic units are derived from the accretionary complex, recording the transition from trench-slope to forearc basin sedimentation. The upper formations represent a large-scale, shallowing-upwards cycle of Kimmeridgian to Albian age, with a volcanic arc provenance.

The Himalia Ridge Formation is a 2.2 km (1.4 mi)-thick sequence of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous conglomerates, immature arkosic sandstones, and mudstones, derived from an andesitic volcanic arc, and deposited in a north-south elongate forearc basin. At the type locality (Himalia Ridge on Ganymede Heights), the formation was deposited as a series of migrating, conglomerate-filled, innet-fan channels and associated overbank-crevasse-splay sheet sands, thin-bedded levees, and interchannel mudstones flanking the basin matgin.

The basin was inverted within a strike-slip regime in the middle Cretaceous, and the sttata deformed into a broad monocline with associated thrusting. At Himalia Ridge, the formation is exposed as a continuous section dipping southeast at about 30°. The upper part of the formation is repeated

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Deep-Water Outcrops

Tor H. Nilsen
Tor H. Nilsen
Desceased
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Roger D. Shew
Roger D. Shew
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
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Gary S. Steffens
Gary S. Steffens
Shell International E&P
Houston, Texas
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Joseph R. J. Studlick
Joseph R. J. Studlick
Maersk Oil America Inc.
Houston, Texas
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
56
ISBN electronic:
9781629810331
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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