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Book Chapter

Precaspian and South Caspian Basins: Subsidence Evolution of Two Superdeep Basins

By
Marie-Françoise Brunet
Marie-Françoise Brunet
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, University P. and M. Curie, France
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Andrei V. Ershov
Andrei V. Ershov
Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
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Yury A. Volozh
Yury A. Volozh
Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
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Maxim V. Korotaev
Maxim V. Korotaev
Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
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Mikhail P. Antipov
Mikhail P. Antipov
Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
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Jean-Paul Cadet
Jean-Paul Cadet
University P. and M. Curie, France
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Published:
January 01, 2007

Abstract

The Precaspian and South Caspian basins are two superdeep basins whose modeling has been undertaken in the frame of the international Peritethys Program that was sponsored by 13 companies or institutions.

The Precaspian Basin is situated to the north of the Caspian Sea mainly on land and has been trapped at the border of the east European Platform with the closure of the Urals Ocean during the Carboniferous. It is also influenced by the repercussions of Tethys closure during the Cenozoic, with the Caucasus compression to the southwest.

The Precaspian Basin contains about 20 km (12 mi) of clastic and carbonate sediments deposited since a time perhaps as old as the Riphean. It comprises a 4-km (2.5-mi) salt layer of Kungurian age (Lower Permian). Salt movements produce numerous salt structures that prevent a precise analysis of the post-salt subsidence.

The basement of the central Precaspian depression (central part of the Precaspian Basin) is characterized by a thin crust (around 10 km [6 mi]) where a low-velocity layer is absent. Its origin is still controversial; it could be either thinned continental or oceanic crust. At the base of the crust, a 8–10-km (4.9–6-mi) layer of velocity 8–8.1km/s (4.9–5mi/s) is recognized by seismic and gravity observations: anomalously high velocities at the base of the crust coincide in place with intense gravitational maxima. Analysis of some peculiarities of the structure, gravitational field, and composition of the crust leads us to suppose that this layer may be interpreted as eclogite. The problem remains on the way of implementation of full analysis.

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Oil and Gas of the Greater Caspian Area

Pinar O. Yilmaz
Pinar O. Yilmaz
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Gary H. Isaksen
Gary H. Isaksen
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
55
ISBN electronic:
9781629810348
Publication date:
January 01, 2007

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