Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Basin-centered Gas or Subtle Conventional Traps?

By
Wayne K. Camp
Wayne K. Camp
Anadarko Petroleum Corporation
,
The Woodlands, Texas
,
U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

Basin-centered gas models have been proposed to characterize various low-permeability (tight) sandstone gas plays that are an important gas resource found in many Rocky Mountain basins. Recent drilling and three-dimensional seismic results indicate that modifications are required of the currently accepted basin-centered gas models that were first introduced more than 25 yr ago. Current models of basin-centered gas accumulations depict gas trapped below a relatively uniform, enigmatic pressure seal defined by a given structural elevation or thermal-maturation depth that cuts across stratigraphic boundaries. In the prevailing model, this surface separates normally pressured conventional traps from unconventional traps, which are characterized by anomalous reservoir pressure and lack of associated water production. These principles have led to a commonly held misconception that basinwide, commercial gas deposits may exist below this pressure boundary and, further, to predictions of overstated reserves and overly optimistic drilling success rates.

New studies of several gas plays in tight sandstones from the Greater Green River Basin in southern Wyoming, reviewed in this chapter, suggest that the primary controls for the occurrence of these fields are better explained as conventional, although subtle, stratigraphic and structural traps. Subsurface data are described, which illustrate additional inconsistencies with the prevalent basin-centered gas models, including the presence of downdip water, and natural fracture and stratigraphic variations that influence productivity. These subtle controls have previously been accepted as poorly understood areas of enhanced production or sweet spots. With a revised understanding, geologic methods can be applied to identify areas of improved reservoir quality, thereby increasing the probability of favorable economic development. More importantly, the key to future exploration success in the Rocky Mountain region and other tight-gas sandstone provinces is recognizing that subtle, conventional stratigraphic and structural traps provide controls on commercial gas deposits in these plays.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Hedberg Series

Understanding, Exploring, and Developing Tight-gas Sands

S. P. Cumella
S. P. Cumella
Bill Barrett Corporation
,
Denver, Colorado
,
U.S.A
.
Search for other works by this author on:
K. W. Shanley
K. W. Shanley
Discovery Group
,
Denver, Colorado
,
U.S.A
.
Search for other works by this author on:
W. K. Camp
W. K. Camp
Anadarko Petroleum Corporation
,
The Woodlands, Texas
,
U.S.A
.
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
3
ISBN electronic:
9781629810324
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal