Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Introduction

By
Richard D. Fritz
Richard D. Fritz
SM Energy, Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
William A. Morgan
William A. Morgan
Conoco Phillips, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Susan Longacre
Susan Longacre
Longacre & Associates, Kerrville, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
James R. Derby
James R. Derby
Consultant, Leonard, Oklahoma, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Charles A. Sternbach
Charles A. Sternbach
Star Creek Energy Company, Inc., Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2012

Abstract

The great American carbonate bank (GACB) refers to a system of carbonates and related siliciclastics that were deposited on and around the Laurentian continent during the Cambrian, Early Ordovician, and earliest Middle Ordovician. This laterally continuous and diverse sequence has been assigned different sets of formation and group names across the GACB, such as Arbuckle, Beekmantown, Bonanza King, Deadwood, Ellenburger, El Paso, Knox, Prairie du Chien, and Potsdam (to name just a few of the more widely used), but characteristic lith of acies and fauna that are found throughout North America, Greenland, northwestern Scotland, Svalbard, and the pre-Cordillera of Argentina are observed.

Fundamental to our understanding of the components of the GACB is the biostratigraphy that ties the disparate parts into a cohesive whole. The importance of biostratigraphy was recognized early on by Jim Wilson, and he worked to integrate it with lithostra-tigraphy, sedimentology, bio facies, cyclic sedimentation, and sequence stratigraphy.

Today, biostratigraphy continues to play a key function in devising a correlation framework across the GACB and in unraveling its evolution. Biostratigraph-ic zonation has advanced considerably since the days when Sloss et al. (1949) coined the term “Sauk sequence” and Palmer (1981) subdivided the Sauk into three subdivisions. It is now possible to identify more than 20 biostratigraphic zones within the Sauk succession for the Laurentian continent (with finer subdivision possible on a more local basis) using mostly trilobites and conodonts. This finer biostratigraphic zonation has led to an increased recognition of events that can

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Memoir

Great American Carbonate Bank: The Geology and Economic Resources of the Cambrian—Ordovician Sauk Megasequence of Laurentia

James Derby
James Derby
Search for other works by this author on:
Richard Fritz
Richard Fritz
Search for other works by this author on:
Susan Longacre
Susan Longacre
Search for other works by this author on:
William Morgan
William Morgan
Search for other works by this author on:
Charles Sternbach
Charles Sternbach
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
98
ISBN electronic:
9781629810201
Publication date:
January 01, 2012

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal