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Borehole Image and Production Logging Drives Well Interventions in Horizontal Gas-oil Gravity Drainage Wells in a Giant Middle Eastern Carbonate Field

By
Edward Follows
Edward Follows
Petroleum Development Oman
,
Muscat
, Sultanate of Oman
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Andrew Beck
Andrew Beck
Petroleum Development Oman
,
Muscat
, Sultanate of Oman
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Andrew Farmer
Andrew Farmer
Petroleum Development Oman
,
Muscat
, Sultanate of Oman
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Saud Al Salmi
Saud Al Salmi
Petroleum Development Oman
,
Muscat
, Sultanate of Oman
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Gerbert de Bruijn
Gerbert de Bruijn
Petroleum Development Oman
,
Muscat
, Sultanate of Oman
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Livio De Pieri
Livio De Pieri
Petroleum Development Oman
,
Muscat
, Sultanate of Oman
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Rudy Welling
Rudy Welling
Petroleum Development Oman
,
Muscat
, Sultanate of Oman
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

Some recent insights are presented into a fractured carbonate oil-rim development in Oman that is produced through both gas-oil gravity drainage (GOGD) and waterflood. Resistivity borehole image (BHI) data are used to characterize the matrix and fractures of the open-hole reservoir sections of the horizontal GOGD producers. Cores in vertical wells were used to calibrate image logs for matrix and fractures confirming, for instance, nodular fabrics seen in BHI. The BHI data are combined with mainly recently acquired production logging tool (PLT) dynamic data in GOGD producer wells to understand the dynamic behavior of matrix and fractures. Six case histories are used to show how this understanding has been used to relocate wells to reduce gas cuts, and through well interventions, isolate water influxes, and attempt to isolate gas influxes.

The BHIs show a conductive fracture population that was divided into three main types based on increasing apparent aperture. The distribution of fractures partly reflects a mechanical stratigraphy. The wackestone to packstone coarsening cycles carry increased numbers of fractures with reduced fracture spacing and wider apertures in the packstone reservoir sublayers. Attempting gas shutoff in these layer-bound fractured intervals has not yet been successful.

A general absence of fractures in the commonly underlying nodular wackestone layers of the GOGD system is observed. Well trajectories targeted specifically into these nodular wackestones, particularly in the lower Natih C2, have avoided fractures associated with overlying packstones with successfully reduced gas cuts allowing continuous instead of cyclical GOGD production.

In addition to the layer-bound fractures, through-going fracture networks impact individual wells. Both aquifer and water injection influxes through such fractures have been successfully shut off, suggesting that the fracture networks are relatively isolated. These shutoffs have allowed previously noncontributing matrix to produce oil.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

Dipmeter and Borehole Image Log Technology

M. Pöppelreiter
M. Pöppelreiter
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C. García-Carballido
C. García-Carballido
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M. Kraaijveld
M. Kraaijveld
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
92
ISBN electronic:
9781629810263
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

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