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Book Chapter

Borehole Image Tool Design, Value of Information, and Tool Selection

By
Javier O. Lagraba P.
Javier O. Lagraba P.
Schlumberger Data and Consulting Services-Wireline, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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M. Hansen Steven
M. Hansen Steven
Schlumberger Wireline, Clamart, France
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Mirano Spalburg
Mirano Spalburg
Shell International Exploration and Production, Rijswijk, Netherlands
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Mohammed Helmy
Mohammed Helmy
Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

Dipmeter and borehole image (BHI) logs supply geoscientists with highresolution records of rock properties and characteristics along the borehole wall. To maximize the value from borehole image logs, the objective of the project should guide the entire workflow from acquisition to processing, to the final interpretation. The planning stage of a logging run should start with an analysis of the information to estimate the monetary benefit of acquiring a BHI data set. Subsequently, tools can be selected which are capable of acquiring the data needed to answer the specific subsurface uncertainties of the project. This chapter outlines the operational principles and technical specifications of common imaging tools and their applications. The selection of the proper tool is influenced by aspects such as geological and petrophysical formation characteristics that can be resolved using either electrical or acoustic tools. Additionally, the well design influences whether a wireline or logging-while-drilling tool is the most practical logging solution. Drilling operations dictate the type of mud system being used, which is significant for determining which borehole imaging tool will be run, depending upon whether it was designed for oil-base or water-base mud.

Other criteria that influence the tool selection are borehole diameter, borehole deviation, required borehole coverage, borehole shape/rugosity, mud cake, borehole temperature, and borehole pressure. This chapter concludes with deliverables of image data at the well site and interpretation centers and their use for quality control.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

Dipmeter and Borehole Image Log Technology

M. Pöppelreiter
M. Pöppelreiter
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C. García-Carballido
C. García-Carballido
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M. Kraaijveld
M. Kraaijveld
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
92
ISBN electronic:
9781629810263
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

GeoRef

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