Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Comparison of Lower Cretaceous Carbonate Shelf Margins, Northern Campeche Escarpment and Northern Florida Escarpment, Gulf of Mexico

By
S.D. Locker
S.D. Locker
University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Geophysics1
Search for other works by this author on:
R.T. Buffler
R.T. Buffler
University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Geophysics1
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1983

Abstract

The early Mesozoic development of shallow-water carbonate shelf margins and banks is an important lithostratigraphic and structural component of many passive continental margins. While the growth of some carbonate provinces has continued to the present (Bahamas), some Cretaceous carbonate margins were buried by the influx of terrigenous clastics (Gulf coast, Western Atlantic margin) or appear to have drowned by some combination of subsidence, sea-level changes, and tectonic activity (Blake Plateau, Campeche Bank, and Florida Bank). During the Lower Cretaceous, the Gulf of Mexico was almost entirely surrounded by shallow carbonate banks which extended to the Blake-Bahamas region. Our objective here is to compare the structural and stratigraphic characteristics of two Lower Cretaceous margin styles found along the steep Campeche and Florida Escarpments (Figure 1). The origin and evolutionary history of these escarpments are poorly understood.

Five sections of deep penetration multifold seismic reflection data are presented. Three lines across the northern Florida Escarpment, MS-1-EB, 16-3-1, 2, and AG-1 (Figure 2), reveal a fairly simple shelf margin in terms of overall structure and stratigraphy. However, two other seismic sections from the northern Campeche Escarpment, lines NECE-9 and GT3-60 (Figures 3 and 4), reveal a more complex Lower Cretaceous margin characterized by landward (or shelfward) prograding seismic sequences. These two margin types may occur along either escarpment. Geophysical information about each of the lines is contained in the Appendix.

The upper limit of Lower Cretaceous sediments in the Gulf of Mexico is defined by a prominent regional middle Cretaceous unconformity (MCU) (Buffler et al, 1980). On the Florida and Campeche banks, the MCU marks the boundary between shallow-water carbonates and overlying deep water deposits (Bryant et al, 1969; Worzel, Bryant et al, 1973; Mitchum, 1978).

The northern Florida Escarpment Lower Cretaceous shelf margin is characterized by a structural high at the escarpment edge, backed by fairly flat-lying units (Figure 2). The high at the margin edge, interpreted to be a reef barrier (Antoine et al, 1967), is characterized by a weak-reflector/chaotic seismic facies. The deepening of reflecting horizons away from the escarpment high suggests differential compaction of lagoonal versus reef or high energy margin-edge sediments. Three lines are shown in Figure 2 to illustrate variations that occur in the width of the inferred reef barrier zone and thickness of foreslope to toe-of-slope deposits. The weak-reflector facies is up to 10 km (6.2 mi) wide on line MS-1-EB, relative to an approximately 2 km (1.2 mi) width on the other lines, suggesting a broad reef or multiple barrier margin. Line AG-1 indicates that a significant thickness of foreslope sedimentation is possible.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Seismic Expression of Structural Styles: A Picture and Work Atlas. Volume 1–The Layered Earth, Volume 2–Tectonics Of Extensional Provinces, & Volume 3–Tectonics Of Compressional Provinces

A. W. Bally
A. W. Bally
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
15
ISBN electronic:
9781629810188
Publication date:
January 01, 1983

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal