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Book Chapter

Other Geological Topics Igneous Intrusions and Extrusions

By
Alexander R. Papp
Alexander R. Papp
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Published:
January 01, 1998

Abstract

Igneous intrusions and extrusions occur in many coal-bearing deposits throughout the world. Dikes, sills, volcanic flows, and tuffs are the most common igneous units associated with coal deposits exploited for coal and CBM.

Igneous intrusions, such as dikes and sills, interrupt the continuity of coal seams and, occasionally, can limit mine development. They also can create barriers to the migration of methane and, therefore, restrict the size of coal reservoirs. Dikes are steeply-dipping, tabular, discordant igneous units, whereas sills are concordant with bedding (Pictures 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5).

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AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Coal Geology

Alexander R. Papp
Alexander R. Papp
Certified Coal Geologist
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James C. Hower
James C. Hower
Certified Coal Geologist
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Douglas C. Peters
Douglas C. Peters
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
45
ISBN electronic:
9781629810195
Publication date:
January 01, 1998

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