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Structural Geology Cleats

By
Alexander R. Papp
Alexander R. Papp
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Published:
January 01, 1998

Abstract

Cleats are the vertical or nearly vertical sets of fractures in coal. Cleats often occur in orthogonal pairs and, when combined with bedding planes, cause most coals to have blocky fracture (Picture 1). The prominent or systematic cleat is called the "face cleat", whereas the less pronounced set is referred to as the "butt cleat" (Pictures 2 and 3). In plan view, the face cleat is generally linear to curvilinear and forms parallel to sub-parallel sets that can be regionally extensive. Butt cleats generally form parallel sets that are aligned normal to the face cleats. Additional sets of cleats can form. In addition, many variations to the general geometry occur (Pattison et al., 1996). Cleat surfaces are usually smooth, but also can be striated. Some cleat surfaces are slickensided or sheared indicating movement.

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Atlas of Coal Geology

Alexander R. Papp
Alexander R. Papp
Certified Coal Geologist
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James C. Hower
James C. Hower
Certified Coal Geologist
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Douglas C. Peters
Douglas C. Peters
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
45
ISBN electronic:
9781629810195
Publication date:
January 01, 1998

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