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Deep-Water Sandstones, Brushy Canyon Formation

By
R. T. Beaubouef
R. T. Beaubouef
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C. R. Rossen
C. R. Rossen
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F. B. Zelt
F. B. Zelt
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M. D. Sullivan
M. D. Sullivan
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D. C. Mohrig
D. C. Mohrig
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D. C. Jennette
D. C. Jennette
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J. A. Bellian
J. A. Bellian
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S. J. Friedman
S. J. Friedman
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R. W. Lovell
R. W. Lovell
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D. S. Shannon
D. S. Shannon
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Published:
January 01, 1999

Abstract

Exceptional oblique-dip exposures of submarine fan complexes of the Brushy Canyon Fm. allow reconstruction of channel geometries and reservoir architecture from the slope to the basin floor. The Brushy Canyon conslsts of 1,500 ft. of basinally restricted sandstones and siltstones that onlap older carbonate slope deposits at the NW margin of the Delaware Basin. This succession represents a lowstand qequence set comprised of lugher frequency sequences that were deposited in the basin during subaerial exposure and bypass of the adjacent carbonate shelf. Progradational sequence stacking patterns reflect changing position and character of the slope as it evolved from a relict, carbonate margin, to a constructional, siltstone-dominated slope. Lowstand fan systems tracts consist of sharp-based, laterally extensive, sand-prone basin floor deposits and large, sand-filled channels encased in siltstones on the slope. The abandonment phase of each sequence (lowstand wedge-transgressive systems tract) consists of basinward-thinning siltstones that drape the basin floor fans. The slope-tobasin distnbution of lithofacies is attributed to a three stage cycle of: 1) erosion, mass wasting, and sand bypass on the slope with concurrent deposition from sand-rich flows on the basin floor, 2) progressive backfilling of feeder channels with variable fill during waning stages of deposition, and 3) cessation of sand delivery to the basin and deposition of laterally-extensive siltstone wedges. Paleocurrents and channel distributions indicate SE-E sediment transport from the NW basin margin via closely spaced point sources.

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AAPG Continuing Education Course Note Series

Deep-Water Sandstones, Brushy Canyon Formation, West Texas

R. T. Beaubouef
R. T. Beaubouef
Search for other works by this author on:
C. R. Rossen
C. R. Rossen
Search for other works by this author on:
F. B. Zelt
F. B. Zelt
Search for other works by this author on:
M. D. Sullivan
M. D. Sullivan
Search for other works by this author on:
D. C. Mohrig
D. C. Mohrig
Search for other works by this author on:
D. C. Jennette
D. C. Jennette
Search for other works by this author on:
J. A. Bellian
J. A. Bellian
Search for other works by this author on:
S. J. Friedman
S. J. Friedman
Search for other works by this author on:
R. W. Lovell
R. W. Lovell
Search for other works by this author on:
D. S. Shannon
D. S. Shannon
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
40
ISBN electronic:
9781629810157
Publication date:
January 01, 1999

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