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Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging and Reservoir Modeling of an Upper Paleozoic “Reefal” Buildup, Reinecke Field, West Texas, United States

By
Arthur H. Saller
Arthur H. Saller
Unocal Corporation, Sugar Land, Texas, U.S.A.
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Skip Walden
Skip Walden
Unocal Corporation, Sugar Land, Texas, U.S.A.
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Steve Robertson
Steve Robertson
Pure Resources, Midland, Texas, U.S.A.
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Robert Nims
Robert Nims
Pure Resources, Midland, Texas, U.S.A.
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Joe Schwab
Joe Schwab
Pure Resources, Midland, Texas, U.S.A.
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Hiroshi Hagiwara
Hiroshi Hagiwara
Japan National Oil Company, Chiba, Japan
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Shigeharu Mizohata
Shigeharu Mizohata
Japan National Oil Company, Chiba, Japan
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

Reinecke field is an upper Pennsylvanian to lowest Permian carbonate buildup in the southern part of the Horseshoe Atoll, west Texas, United States. The field and surrounding areas have been imaged with three 3-D seismic surveys and penetrated by many wells. Although Reinecke is commonly referred to as a reefal reservoir, deposition occurred in stratified sequences, 50–100 ft (15–30 m) thick, dominated by wackestones, packstones, and grainstones. Boundstones (mainly rich in phylloid algae) constitute only 16% of the buildup. Seismic reflectors within the buildup parallel sequence boundaries and are truncated at the margins of the buildup. Three-dimensional seismic surveys show that the top of the Reinecke buildup is highly irregular with more than 470 ft (143 m) of relief. Deep-marine shales overlie the reservoir and act as a seal for this stratigraphic trap. Reinecke's irregular, mounded morphology is the result of localized carbonate growth and erosional truncation. Much of the erosional truncation probably occurred in a deep-marine environment.

Reinecke's south dome acts a single continuous reservoir dominated by limestone (70%) with 25% dolomite. Limestone porosity is generally 5–18% (average of 11.2%) and permeability is 1–1000md(average of 166 md). Dolomite porosity is lower (average of 8.3%), but permeability is higher (average of 894 md). Discontinuous low-permeability layers parallel to stratification serve as low-permeability baffles; however, patchy replacive dolomites cut through stratification and act as high-permeability vertical conduits. Good reservoir continuity, low-permeability baffles, and artificially enhanced bottomwater drive helped to recover more than 50% of the original oil in place. Excellent vertical reservoir continuity has allowed implementation of a crestal CO2 flood at Reinecke field. CO2 is being injected into the top of the structure, displacing residual and bypassed mobile oil downward for recovery in lower parts of the reservoir.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

Seismic Imaging of Carbonate Reservoirs and Systems

Gregor P. Eberli
Gregor P. Eberli
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Jose Luis Masaferro
Jose Luis Masaferro
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J. F. “Rick” Sarg
J. F. “Rick” Sarg
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
81
ISBN electronic:
9781629810058
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

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