Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Development of Synthetic Layer Dip Adjacent to Normal Faults

By
David A. Ferrill
David A. Ferrill
Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Alan P. Morris
Alan P. Morris
Division of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Darrell W. Sims
Darrell W. Sims
Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio,Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Deborah J. Waiting
Deborah J. Waiting
Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Shutaro Hasegawa
Shutaro Hasegawa
Technology Research Center, Japan National Oil Corporation, Chiba, Japan.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2005

Abstract

Field analyses of normal faulting illustrate that synthetic layer dip associated with normal faults is a common feature of extensional fault systems. These synthetic dip panels are developed where layers on upthrown, downthrown, or both sides of a normal fault dip toward the downthrown side of the fault. Synthetic dip panels adjacent to normal faults should be expected at some scale in all normal fault systems. In addition to faults that developed in the strata with a regional dip, five fault-related mechanisms for the development of synthetic dip are faulted monocline (fault tip-line folding), antilistric fault bend, distributed shear, shear in relay zone of vertically and/or laterally segmented faults, and fault block impingement and lateral contraction. Development of synthetic dip accommodates a component of throw by tilting or folding, thereby reducing the offset or true displacement on the related normal faults. Fault block deformation is strongly dependent on the mechanisms that produce synthetic dip panels and may influence fault zone and fault block permeability. Depending on strat-igraphic and structural relationships, synthetic dip panels can produce a downthrown closure for hydrocarbon trapping, provide fluid migration and/or production communication pathways across faults, or produce barriers to fluid communication across faults.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Memoir

Faults, Fluid Flow, and Petroleum Traps

Rasoul Sorkhabi
Rasoul Sorkhabi
Search for other works by this author on:
Yoshihiro Tsuji
Yoshihiro Tsuji
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
85
ISBN electronic:
9781629810065
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal