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Book Chapter

Avoiding Extraterrestrial Claim Jumping: Economic Development Policy for Space Exploration and Exploitation

By
James F. Reilly, II
James F. Reilly, II
American Public University System, 111 W. Congress St., Charles Town, West Virginia, 25414, U.S.A. (e-mail: jreilly@apus.edu)
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

Any frontier exploration effort transitions eventually to an exploitation phase. Exploitation can be research or economic in nature. In either case, a regulatory framework is required to coordinate and govern any activity in the new realm. The Earth orbital regime has entered the exploitation phase with the advent of a permanent research facility in the form of the International Space Station (ISS) and increasing activity in the private sector. The lunar regime and perhaps near-Earth asteroids will be potentially entering the exploitation phase within the next two decades. A regulatory structure in the form of an international agreement using elements similar to the Antarctic Treaty and the Intergovernmental Agreement for the ISS may be used as an example of a potential regulatory structure for the exploitation of the extraterrestrial environment. Inevitably, economic development will follow the research phase if not specifically prohibited in any future treaties or agreements. To manage these activities, an organization similar to the World Trade Organization could form the basis of a management body for economic activities.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

Energy Resources for Human Settlement in the Solar System and Earth’s Future in Space

William A. Ambrose
William A. Ambrose
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James F. Reilly, II
James F. Reilly, II
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Douglas C. Peters
Douglas C. Peters
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
101
ISBN electronic:
9781629810027
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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