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The Late Miocene to Early Pliocene RÍO Blanco-Los Bronces Copper Deposit, Central Chilean Andes

By
L. Serrano
L. Serrano
Division Andina, CODELCO, Casilla 6A, Los Andes, Chile
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R. Vargas
R. Vargas
Division Andina, CODELCO, Casilla 6A, Los Andes, Chile
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V. Stambuk
V. Stambuk
Division Andina, CODELCO, Casilla 6A, Los Andes, Chile
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C. Aguilar
C. Aguilar
Division Andina, CODELCO, Casilla 6A, Los Andes, Chile
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M. Galeb
M. Galeb
Division Andina, CODELCO, Casilla 6A, Los Andes, Chile
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C. Holmgren
C. Holmgren
Compañía Minera Disputada de las Condes S.A., Casilla 16178, Correo 9, Santiago, Chile
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A. Contreras
A. Contreras
Compañía Minera Disputada de las Condes S.A., Casilla 16178, Correo 9, Santiago, Chile
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S. Godoy
S. Godoy
Compañía Minera Disputada de las Condes S.A., Casilla 16178, Correo 9, Santiago, Chile
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I. Vela
I. Vela
Compañía Minera Disputada de las Condes S.A., Casilla 16178, Correo 9, Santiago, Chile
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M. A. Skewes
M. A. Skewes
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0250, U.S.A.
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C. R. Stern
C. R. Stern
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0250, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 1998

Abstract

Rio Blanco-Los Bronces, one of three giant late Miocene to early Pliocene copper deposits in the Andes of central Chile, formed as a result of emplacement of both multiple mineralized breccias and porphyry intrusions into early and middle Miocene plutonic rocks and Cenozoic lavas. The deposit is distinctive in that a significant proportion of the >50x106 metric tons of Cu it contains occurs within the matrix of mineralized breccia pipes or disseminated in the host rocks around the breccias. Approximately 50 percent of the Cu ore in the deposit occurs as breccia-matrix, stockwork, and disseminated mineralization in a zone of potassic alteration which formed during the emplacement of biotite-rich breccias of the Rio Blanco breccia complex and quartz monzonite porphyry intrusions. Following a period of uplift and erosion, younger tourmaline-rich breccia pipes, containing the other 50 percent of the Cu in the deposit, and weakly mineralized early Pliocene porphyries were emplaced both within and peripherally to the earlier zone of biotite breccias and potassic alteration. Clasts within the tourmaline breccias are sericitized. This sericitic alteration developed during the emplacement of these breccias, later than and independent of the earlier potassic alteration.

Fluid inclusion and 0-, S-, and H-isotopic data indicate that the metal-rich fluids that generated both the older biotite-rich and younger tourmaline-rich breccias, and caused the potassic and sericitic alteration associated with these two breccia generations, were magmatic in origin. Sr- and Nd-isotopic data imply that the magmas that exsolved the breccia-forming fluids, as well as those that formed the late porphyries, were distinct isotopically from the older host rocks of the deposit. The breccia-forming fluids are believed to have exsolved from magmas that crystallized to form plutons that are still not exposed at the surface, consistent with the deep, as yet unknown roots of these breccias.

The emplacement of the mineralized breccias and porphyries at Rio Blanco-Los Bronces occurred in conjunction with late Miocene changes in Andean magma chemistry and crustal thickness, within a period of<3 m.y. during the final stages of>15 m.y. ofMiocene magmatic activity in central Chile. The temporal changes in magma chemistry, the crustal thickening, uplift, and erosion which caused the younger mineralized tourmaline breccias to be superimposed on the earlier and deeper potassic alteration zone, and the decline of igneous activity in the Miocene magmatic belt all resulted from decreasing subduction angle beneath central Chile beginning in the middle to late Miocene.

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Contents

Special Publications of the Society of Economic Geologists

Andean Copper Deposits: New Discoveries, Mineralization, Styles and Metallogeny

Francisco Camus
Francisco Camus
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Richard M. Sillitoe
Richard M. Sillitoe
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Richard Petersen
Richard Petersen
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Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
5
ISBN electronic:
9781629490298
Publication date:
January 01, 1998

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