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Mineralogical and Microchemical Methods for the Characterization of High-Grade Banded Iron Formation-Derived Iron Ore

By
Brick Ramanaidou
Brick Ramanaidou
CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Australian Resources Research Centre, P.O. Box 1130, Bentley, Western Australia 6102, Australia
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Martin Wells
Martin Wells
CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Australian Resources Research Centre, P.O. Box 1130, Bentley, Western Australia 6102, Australia
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David Belton
David Belton
CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Box 312, Clayton, South Victoria 3168, Australia
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Michael verrall
Michael verrall
CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Australian Resources Research Centre, P.O. Box 1130, Bentley, Western Australia 6102, Australia
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Chris Ryan
Chris Ryan
CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Box 312, Clayton, South Victoria 3168, Australia
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Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

A range of techniques has been applied to the mineralogical and microchemical characterization of high-grade iron ore hosted by banded iron formation (BIF), including reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, and proton induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE). These tools provide key physicochemical properties of the main ore minerals, such as magnetite, kenomagnetite, maghemite, hematite, and goethite, which in turn determine the grade of the deposit and its economic viability. For instance, current automated HyLogging™ systems, based on reflectance spectroscopy, provide quick and objective measurements of hematite, goethite, and gangue mineralogy on large volume of cores and drill chips. X-ray diffraction used on powders offers a full account of the bulk mineralogy of the sample as well as aluminum substitution in the structure of hematite, goethite, and maghemite. On the other hand, Raman spectroscopy provides in situ iron oxide mineralogy and cation substitution at the thin section scale. In situ microchemical analyses, using scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and PIXE, emphasize the mineralogical relationship and distribution of deleterious elements such as P, Al, and Si that underpins the development of downstream processing methods for assessing upgradability and exploitation of iron ore deposits.

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Contents

Reviews in Economic Geology

Banded Iron Formation-Related High-Grade Iron Ore

Steffen Hagemann
Steffen Hagemann
Centre for Exploration Targeting, School of Earth and Geographical Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
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Carlos Alberto Rosière
Carlos Alberto Rosière
Centro de Pesquisas Prof. Manoel Teixeira da Costa, Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos 6627, Campus Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270.90, Brazil
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Jens Gutzmer
Jens Gutzmer
Paleoproterozoic Mineralization Research Group, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa
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Nicolas J. Beukes
Nicolas J. Beukes
Paleoproterozoic Mineralization Research Group, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa
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Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
15
ISBN electronic:
9781629490229
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

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