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Metalliferous Black Shales: Accumulation of Carbon and Metals in Cratonic Basins

By
R. B. Schultz
R. B. Schultz
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Published:
January 01, 1991

Abstract

Black shales are frequently repositories for valuable metal constituents and represent a record of past anoxic water conditions. These metalliferous, carbon-rich units also record geochemical interactions of carbon, iron, sulfur, oxygen, and often phosphorus. Thus, although not ores at present, except for some small operations in China, metalliferous black shales have considerable importance for understanding processes of metal enrichment in sedimentary rocks.

Significant early work on black shales includes the appreciation of the importance of anoxic water conditions in their formation (Pettijohn, 1949), association with a distinctive biofacies, for example (Bulman, 1955), and the conclusion that, under modern conditions, these anoxic-water sediments are formed in basins restricted from free exchange with the open ocean, leading to stagnation in the bottom part of the water column (Strom, 1939). Such situations are rare in the modem, but the Lower Paleozoic and the Mesozoic rock records are indicative of more widespread anoxia when global climate was warmer and more equable.

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Contents

Reviews in Economic Geology

Sedimentary and Diagenetic Mineral Deposits: A Basin Analysis Approach to Exploration

Eric R. Force
Eric R. Force
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J. James Eidel
J. James Eidel
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J. Barry Maynard
J. Barry Maynard
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Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
5
ISBN electronic:
9781629490120
Publication date:
January 01, 1991

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