Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Sulfide Mineralogy, Geochemistry, and Ore Genesis of the Kidd Creek Deposit: Part I. North, Central, and South Orebodies*

By
M. D. Hannington
M. D. Hannington
Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E8
Search for other works by this author on:
W. Bleeker
W. Bleeker
Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E8
Search for other works by this author on:
I. Kjarsgaard
I. Kjarsgaard
Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E8
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1999

Abstract

The Kidd Creek mine is an Archean volcanogenic Cu-Zn deposit with total past production and current reserves of more than 138.5 Mt at 2.4 percent Cu, 6.5 percent Zn, 0.23 percent Pb, 90 g/t Ag, and up to 0.15 percent Sn. The massive sulfides occur at the top of a locally thickened felsic volcanic pile, within and overlying a succession of massive rhyolite flows, volcaniclastic rocks, and coarse epiclastic units. The felsic volcanics occupy the core of an anomalous, S-shaped fold structure and attain a maximum thickness of approximately 300 m beneath the deposit. Massive autobrecciated rhyolite occurs at the base of the mine sequence and is interpreted to be a proximal vent facies. The local volcanic basement comprises mainly ultramafic flows, intercalated with minor rhyolite. The ultramafic rocks are interpreted to be early extrusive lavas associated with the development of an extensional rift. Basaltic pillow lavas and breccias occur in the hanging wall of the mine and are extensively intruded by gabbroic sills. South of the mine, this stratigraphy is truncated along the contact with younger, regional metasedi-mentary rocks.

Kidd Creek is typical of a class of large volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits that occur within thick successions of permeable felsic volcaniclastic rocks and are dominated by large, stratiform, Zn-rich lenses with laterally extensive zones of ore-grade Cu mineralization. The deposit consists of three main ore-bodies (the North, Central, and South orebodies) that are distributed along an inferred boundary fault of a linear, grabenlike depression. The present deposits have a restored strike length of at least 2 km, indicating remarkable continuity of the hydrothermal system along the length of the graben. The main ore lenses formed by infilling and strata-bound replacement of volcaniclastic rocks, coarse volcanic breccias, and finer grained tuffs that filled the graben. Abundant relics of silicified rhyolite within the massive sulfides, gradational contacts between the massive sulfides and unmineralized fragmental rocks at the margins of the ore zones, and extensive replacement within the hanging-wall breccias confirm that a large part of the deposit formed below the sea floor. Burial of the deposits by mass flows was coincident with mineralization, and subsea-floor deposition of sulfides progressed laterally into the volcaniclastic rocks adjacent to the ore lenses. Metalliferous sediments or exhalative horizons are notably absent, and there is little evidence that widespread venting of high-temperature fluids occurred at the sea floor. Deposition of sulfides within the thick sequence of basin fill ensured that ore-forming fluids were confined to the graben and relatively little metal was lost to high-temperature discharge.

The development of the three main orebodies is best explained by a long-lived, low-temperature hydrothermal system punctuated by several higher temperature pulses of Cu-rich fluid. Focusing of the fluids was caused by intense silicification of the rhyolite above and adjacent to the main upflow zone. Extensive lateral flow occurred within the bedded volcaniclastic rocks, and the highest temperature fluids appear to have occupied a number of high-level aquifers beneath the deposits. These are marked by conformable lenses of chlorite alteration, semimassive chalcopyrite, and strata-bound chalcopyrite stringer mineralization. The larger alteration envelope is broadly conformable to the ore lenses and consists of quartz and sericite, together with chlorite, Fe-rich carbonate, and minor tourmaline.

Two main ore suites occur at Kidd Creek: a low-temperature, polymetallic suite enriched in Zn, Ag, Pb, Cd, Sn, Sb, As, Hg, ±Tl, ± W, and a higher temperature suite of Cu, Co, Bi, Se, In, ± Ni. The massive ores consist mainly of pyrite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite, together with galena, tetrahedrite, ar-senopyrite, and cassiterite, in a quartz and siderite gangue. However, more than 60 different ore minerals and ore-related gangue minerals are present, including complex assemblages of Co-As sulfides, Cu-Sn sulfides, Ag minerals, and selenides. Tin is present as cassiterite in the upper part of the massive sphalerite lenses and as stannite in the underlying chalcopyrite-rich ores. Despite the high Ag content of the deposit, Kidd Creek is remarkably Au poor. The ores exhibit a close chemical affinity with their immediate felsic host rocks, including strong coenrichments of Ag, Pb, As, Sn, W, and F However, the complex metal assemblage suggests that a more primitive mafic suite may also have played a role in metal supply. The extensive metagraywackes to the south of the mine are younger than Kidd Creek and therefore could not have been a source for metals. An abundance of pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite, high Fe sphalerite, and Fe-rich chlorite indicates predominantly low fO2–fS2 conditions, and the abundant siderite in the ore indicates that the hydrothermal fluids were highly enriched in CO2. Sulfur isotope compositions range from -2.4 to +3.3 per mil, with the bulk of the massive sulfides having S34S values close to 0 per mil.

The mineralogy and bulk composition of the Kidd Creek ores bear a closer resemblance to those of many Phanerozoic Zn-Cu-Pb deposits (e.g., Bathurst, Neves Corvo) than to other Archean Cu-Zn deposits. The predominance of Zn-rich ores (ca. 70–80 Mt) implies that most of the deposit formed at low temperatures (ca. 250°C). Solubility modeling indicates that a large hydrothermal system at relatively low temperatures would have been sufficient to account for about 75 percent of the metals. The significant enrichments in Ag, Pb, and Sn reflect not only the abundance of felsic volcanic rocks in the mine sequence but also the sustained, low-temperature venting history of the deposit. In contrast, the Cu-rich ores appear to have been introduced during relatively short-lived, hydrothermal pulses at much higher temperatures. The higher temperatures most likely coincided with discrete felsic magmatic events that occurred at several intervals during the ∼3.5 m.y. history of the volcanic complex. The late-stage introduction of Cu may indicate that the Cu-rich fluids evolved separately from the lower temperature, con-vective part of the hydrothermal system. This model is supported by the presence of a high-grade bornite zone in the South orebody, which represents a massive influx of Cu metal at peak hydrothermal temperatures late in the development of the Cu stringer zone.

Kidd Creek resembles sulfide deposits that are currently forming in young, intraoceanic back-arc rifts, such as the Lau basin, and this may be an appropriate modern analogue for the Kidd Creek setting. The combination of voluminous mafic-ultramafic flows in the footwall of the deposit, punctuated by anomalous felsic volcanism, and the extensive deposits of coarse epiclastic rocks and volcaniclastic sediments suggest that Kidd Creek formed within a subsiding rift basin. The importance of a plumelike source for the ultramafic melts and the longevity of the hydrothermal system may indicate that rifting occurred above a stationary hot spot.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Economic Geology Monograph Series

The Giant Kidd Creek Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit, Western Abitibi Subprovince, Canada

Mark D. Hannington
Mark D. Hannington
Search for other works by this author on:
C. Tucker Barrie
C. Tucker Barrie
Search for other works by this author on:
Society of Economic Geologists
Volume
10
ISBN electronic:
9781629490052
Publication date:
January 01, 1999

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal