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Archean Carbon and Oxygen Reservoirs: Their Significance for Fluid Sources and Circulation Paths for Archean Mesothermal Gold Deposits of the Norseman-Wiluna Belt, Western Australia

By
S. D. Golding
S. D. Golding
Department of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4067, Australia
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N. J. McNaughton
N. J. McNaughton
Key Centre for Strategic Mineral Deposits, Department of Geology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia
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M. E. Barley
M. E. Barley
Key Centre for Strategic Mineral Deposits, Department of Geology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia
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D. I. Groves
D. I. Groves
Key Centre for Strategic Mineral Deposits, Department of Geology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia
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S. E. Ho
S. E. Ho
Key Centre for Strategic Mineral Deposits, Department of Geology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia
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N. M. S. Rock
N. M. S. Rock
Key Centre for Strategic Mineral Deposits, Department of Geology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia
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J. V. Turner
J. V. Turner
Division of Water Resources, CSIRO, Wembley, Western Australia 6014, Australia
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Published:
January 01, 1989

Abstract

Carbon and oxygen isotope studies of carbonate minerals from the two carbonate alteration styles that predate regional metamorphism and gold mineralization in the Norseman-Wiluna greenstone belt of Western Australia have significance for the sources of carbon and oxygen in ore fluids that produce Archean mesothermal gold deposits. The mantle-derived carbon reservoir in regional carbonation zones is the most likely source for auriferous ore fluids rather than the seawater-derived carbon reservoir in altered basalts. The wide range of δ13C values for gold-related carbonates reflects dissolution of different carbonate species and/or a variable input of organic and seawater-derived carbon.

The oxygen isotope compositions of auriferous ore fluids in the Norseman-Wiluna belt (δ18O = 4-9‰) indicate that these fluids (1) could have been in equilibrium with sea floor-altered basalts at 500° to 600°C, (2) derived from regional carbonation zones or interacted with them, or (3) derived from felsic porphyries or granitoids only if modified by subsequent fluid-rock interaction or changing P-T-X conditions.

There is a positive correlation between δ13C and δ18O for carbonates from gold-related alteration (both district and mine scale), with data for the two largest Archean mesothermal gold deposits in the world (Kalgoorlie, Western Australia; and Timmins, Ontario) plotting at the most positive end of this trend. Correlated δ13C and δ18O variations in gold-related carbonates on a district scale probably relate to source-conduit heterogeneities and host-rock compositional controls, whereas on a mine scale a model involving finite reservoir effects for carbon, temperature-controlled oxygen isotope fractionation, and possibly phase separation can account for the observed trends.

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Contents

Economic Geology Monograph Series

The Geology of Gold Deposits: The Perspective in 1988

Reid R. Keays
Reid R. Keays
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W. R. H. Ramsay
W. R. H. Ramsay
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David I. Groves
David I. Groves
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Society of Economic Geologists
ISBN electronic:
9781629490014
Publication date:
January 01, 1989

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