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Book Chapter

Introduction

By
Reid R. Keays
Reid R. Keays
Department of Geology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
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Brian J. Skinner
Brian J. Skinner
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520
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Published:
January 01, 1989

Abstract

When the price of gold rose from about $200 (U.S.) an ounce in 1979 to nearly $700 an ounce by the end of the same year, the gold rush of the 1980s was under way. Gold production in the western world rose dramatically; from 1981 to 1986 production increased by 300 to 1,282 metric tons per year. Annual production may reach 1,500 to 1,600 metric tons by 1990 (Woodall, 1988). The major contributors to the increased stream of gold have been Australia, Canada, Brazil, and the United States together with other circum-Pacific countries. The increased price of gold and new methods of extraction have allowed many older deposits to be reopened, but the most important factor has been the high success level of exploration. This success has resulted in large part from the application of new genetic models and from the development of new exploration techniques.

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Contents

Economic Geology Monograph Series

The Geology of Gold Deposits: The Perspective in 1988

Reid R. Keays
Reid R. Keays
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W. R. H. Ramsay
W. R. H. Ramsay
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David I. Groves
David I. Groves
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Society of Economic Geologists
ISBN electronic:
9781629490014
Publication date:
January 01, 1989

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