Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Hueco Mountains Introduction

By
J. A. (Toni) Simo
J. A. (Toni) Simo
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Search for other works by this author on:
Greg P. Wahlman
Greg P. Wahlman
BP-Amoco, Houston
Search for other works by this author on:
Michelle. L. Stoklosa
Michelle. L. Stoklosa
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Search for other works by this author on:
Jen L. Beall
Jen L. Beall
Texaco, Houston
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

J. A. (Tom) Simo, Greg P. Wahlman, Michelle L. Stoklosa, Jen L. Beall

The Permian was a remarkable geological period, and it is reflected in the abundance of important sedimentary mineral resources. It represents the maximum stage of Pangeacontinental accretion, a gigantic continent from pole to pole surrounded by an all-encompassing ocean. The large Permsylvanian-Lower Permian Gondwana polar ice cap was at its maximum and later was partially replaced by large lakes. Chemically, Permian seas reached the most extreme values of carbon, sulfur, and strontium isotopic ratios, but returned abruptly to normal values close to the end of the Permian period (Scholle et al., 1995). Fauna and flora show an increasing provincialism that culminated at the end of the Permian with one of the largest extinction events in Earth’s history.

The Permian rocks reflect those extreme physical, chemical, and biologic changes. As such, the Permian sedimentary record is unique to explain changes in the biosphere, and the occurrence and distribution of economic deposits. For instance, from early to late Permian, source bed accumulation shifted from a period of major to minor occurrences respectively. The abundance of carbon in the sedimentary record is in part the reason of large early-middle Permian in age reserves of oil and gas (minimum global estimates are 28.4 MMM13 of oil and 6642 TCF of gas; Mazzullo, 1995). Similarly, the global cycle of phosphorous followed that of carbon (phosphorite deposits are early to middle Permian; Herring, 1995). The high carbon

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

SEPM Field Trip Guide

Permian Platforms and Reefs in the Guadalupe and Hueco Mountains

Paul M. (Mitch) Harris
Paul M. (Mitch) Harris
Chevron Petroleum Technology, Houston, TX
Search for other works by this author on:
J. A. (Toni) Simo
J. A. (Toni) Simo
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Search for other works by this author on:
SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
9
ISBN electronic:
9781565763210
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal