Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Influence of Deposition and Early Diagenesis on Porosity and Chemical Compaction in Two Paleozoic Buildups: Mississippian and Permian Age Rocks in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

By
Eugene A. Shinn
Eugene A. Shinn
U. S. Geological Survey, Fisher Island Station, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Search for other works by this author on:
Daniel M. Robbin
Daniel M. Robbin
U. S. Geological Survey, Fisher Island Station, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Search for other works by this author on:
Barbara H. Lidz
Barbara H. Lidz
U. S. Geological Survey, Fisher Island Station, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Search for other works by this author on:
J. Harold Hudson
J. Harold Hudson
U. S. Geological Survey, Fisher Island Station, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1983

Abstract

Two Paleozoic “bioherms” exposed on the western flank of the Sacramento Mountains, Otero County, New Mexico, were cored using a geologist-operated hydraulic coring device. A 16.4 m (54 ft) core penetrated the entire Scorpion Mound (14 m; 46 ft) and an underlying sandstone, both of the Laborcita Formation (Permian, Wolfcampian), whereas a 20.8 m (68 ft) core partially penetrated the central mound facies of the more than 100 m (328 ft) thick Muleshoe Mound (Mississippian, Osagean/Visean) of the Lake Valley Formation.

Preliminary study of these cores revealed: (I) Partial marine cementation of the complex “collapse-brecciated” algal plate-lime mudstone and wackestone of Scorpion Mound versus the more-thoroughly marine-cemented bryozoan and crinoidal Muleshoe Mound showed how later compaction was controlled by syn-depositional processes. For example, Muleshoe Mound, which had experienced greater overburden, contained fewer stylolites than Scorpion Mound. (2) “Collapse-breccia” is interpreted to have formed in the marine environment by compaction of an irregularly cemented void-filled lime mudstone, rather than within the vadose zone as traditionally interpreted. (3) Much of the muddy sediment and submarine botryoidal fan druse cement in Scorpion Mound formed in syndepositional cavities. The stages of internal sediment, called “vadose silt” by most workers, is interpreted as marine or early burial in origin. (4) Mounds in the Laborcita Formation were probably localized on underlying sandstone thicks. (5) Marine cementation occluded depositional porosity of the central mound facies in Muleshoe Mound, whereas most cement in the flanking crinoidal beds is of secondary origin and was probably derived as a byproduct of extensive chemical “grain-to-grain” compaction.

An appreciation of the influence of the two differing styles of syndepositional diagenesis has direct application for predicting porosity and permeability in subsurface analog buildups.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

SEPM Core Workshop Notes

Carbonate Buildups-A Core Workshop

Paul M. Harris
Paul M. Harris
Search for other works by this author on:
SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
4
ISBN electronic:
9781565762596
Publication date:
January 01, 1983

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal