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Book Chapter

Intertwined Fates of Metals, Sulfur, and Organic Carbon in Black Shales

By
Lisa M. Pratt
Lisa M. Pratt
Biogeochemical Laboratories Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405
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Cara L. Davis
Cara L. Davis
Biogeochemical Laboratories Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405
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Published:
January 01, 1992

Abstract

When the input rate of readily degradable organic matter exceeds the replenishment rate of oxygen in marine sediments, anoxic environments develop. During anoxic diagenesis, the sediment system becomes a reservoir for sulfur due to reduction-oxidation reactions associated with communities of anaerobic bacteria. Concentrations of metals and organic carbon are covariant in many black muds and shales due to 1) direct chemical complexing of metal ions with hetero-atomic functional groups on thermally immature organic matter and/or 2) reduction of sulfate and metals using organic substrates as an electron donor and resulting in precipitation of metallic sulfides or elemental metals. Early diagenetic formation of metallo- and sulfuro-organic ligands plays an important role in selective preservation of specific organic compounds. Future research will reveal the extent to which such processes influence the overall preservation of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks.

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Contents

SEPM Short Course Notes

Geochemistry of Organic Matter in Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks

Lisa M. Pratt
Lisa M. Pratt
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John B. Comer
John B. Comer
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Simon C. Brassell
Simon C. Brassell
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Ruth Droppo
Ruth Droppo
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
27
ISBN electronic:
9781565762503
Publication date:
January 01, 1992

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