Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Applications of Coal Petrology in Oil and Gas Exploration

By
John C. Crelling
John C. Crelling
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1980

Abstract

The reflectance of a coal sample is usually measured on the vitrinite macerals because this group of macerals shows a fairly uniform increase of reflectance with increasing rank. However, there are some important jumps or discontinuities with the increase in rank, especially in the reflectance ranges of 0.6-0.7 (the first coalification jump of Teichmuller, 1970) and 1.30-1.40 (the second coalification jump of Teichmuller, 1970). For example, when the dry, ash-free volatile matter is plotted against the reflectance for a series of coals, discontinuities appear at both of these points. Also the color of spores in transmitted light go from a bright yellow to a dull brown to black (opaque) in this reflectance range. The fluorescence intensity of the various liptinite macerals is high at the lower end and decreases toward the second jump. The fluorescence colors also change from bright yellows and oranges to dull reds and browns. Of course, the biggest change of the liptinite macerals with rank is their disappearance at the second jump. In general, there are no liptinite macerals in coals with a reflectance of greater than 1.4%.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

SEPM Short Course Notes

Principles and Applications Of Coal Petrology

John. C. Crelling
John. C. Crelling
Search for other works by this author on:
Russel R. Dutcher
Russel R. Dutcher
Department of Geology and Coal Research Center Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois 62901
Search for other works by this author on:
SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
8
ISBN electronic:
9781565762374
Publication date:
January 01, 1980

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal