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Reservoir Heterogeneity of Miocene–Pliocene Deltaic Sandstones at Attaka and Serang Fields, Kutei Basin, Offshore East Kalimantan, Indonesia

By
Arthur S. Trevena
Arthur S. Trevena
Unocal Exploration and Production Technology, 14141 Southwest Freeway. Sugar Land, Texas 77478 U.S.A. e-mail: atrevena@unocal.com
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Yoseph J. Partono
Yoseph J. Partono
Unocal Indonesia Co., Pasir Ridge, P. O. Box 276, Balikpapan, East Kalimantan, Indonesia e-mail: yjpartono@unocal.com
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Tom Clark
Tom Clark
Unocal Gulf of Mexico Region, 14141 Southwest Freeway. Sugar Land, Texas 77478 U.S.A. e-mail: tom.clark@unocal.com
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Published:
January 01, 2003

Abstract

Heterogeneous sandstones in upper to middle Miocene lobes of the Mahakam Delta are prolific hydrocarbon reservoirs in the lower Kutei Basin, offshore East Kalimantan, Indonesia. At Attaka and Serang fields, more than 99 million cubic meters (627 million barrels) of oil and 37 billion cubic meters (1.3 trillion cubic ft) of gas have been produced from sandstones that we interpret as delta-front bars and tidal/fluvial distributary channels. Sand bodies of the modern Mahakam delta are analogs for many of these reservoirs.

Delta-front bars are burrowed to laminated, fine-grained sandstones that form equant to somewhat dip-elongate bodies that range in thickness from < 1 m to 5 m and may exceed several kilometers in width. Cross-stratified, coarse- to fine-grained tidal/fluvial distributary channel sandstones are 3 to 17 m thick and narrow (< 1.5 km wide).

Distributary-channel sandstones are typically highly porous (20–35%) and permeable (100–10,000 md), although tidal distributaries exhibit permeability heterogeneity, due to mud drapes and local burrows. Delta-front sandstones, although areally extensive, have generally poorer reservoir quality than the distributary channel sandstones (k = < 0.1–1000 md; porosity = 10–25%). Also, the delta-front sands exhibit major centimeter- to decimeter-scale variations in permeability, which are related to variations in clay content and intensity of burrowing.

Stacked, distributary-channel reservoirs are especially well developed in the Upper Miocene “Main Deltaics” interval, which we interpret as a succession of lowstand deltaic lobes.

The coarsest-grained and thickest deltaic sandstones typically accumulate during relative lowstands, times when deltas have prograded long distances across marine shelves. Such lowstand sandstones also form the most porous and permeable hydrocarbon reservoirs. Thin-bedded sandstones and burrowed sandstones are common in distal deltaic deposits, which were probably deposited during times of somewhat higher relative sea level. Such sandstones may form low-resistivity reservoirs, which can, if recognized, contribute substantially to hydrocarbon production.

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Contents

SEPM Special Publication

Tropical Deltas of Southeast Asia—Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Petroleum Geology

F. Hasan Sidi
F. Hasan Sidi
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Dag Nummedal
Dag Nummedal
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Patrice Imbert
Patrice Imbert
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Herman Darman
Herman Darman
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Henry W. Posamentier
Henry W. Posamentier
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
76
ISBN electronic:
9781565762138
Publication date:
January 01, 2003

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