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Late Quaternary Sedimentation and Peat Development in the Rajang River Delta, Sarawak, East Malaysia

By
James R. Staub
James R. Staub
Department of Geology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, Illinois 62901-4324, U.S.A.
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Robert A. Gastaldo
Robert A. Gastaldo
Department of Geology, Colby College, 5820 Mayflower Hill, Waterville, Maine 04901-8858, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 2003

Abstract

Thick, domed peat deposits dominate most of the surface of the mesotidal to macrotidal Rajang River delta, tidally influenced alluvial valley, and adjacent coastal plain. Northeast-striking shoreline terrace sands that crop out along the landward margin of the delta and coastal plain and gravel outcrops in the alluvial valley are the surface expression of the VIIa highstand surface of 125 ka (oxygen isotope stage 5e). The upper few meters of the VIIa surface have undergone podzolization, are leached white, and are easily mapped. Near the present coast a peat/lignite bed, at a depth of 80 m, represents the IIIb highstand surface (oxygen isotope stage 3), indicating that 40 m of subsidence has occurred in the last 40 ka. In the alluvial valley, gravel dominates the base of an incised-valley fill 10 km wide and 45 m thick and is overlain by a fining-upward succession, the upper part of which is tidally influenced. Eroded Pleistocene terraces, mantled with thick peat, flank the Recent incised-valley fill. Within interfluve areas in the landward one-half of the northeast delta plain and adjacent coastal plain, thick Recent peat deposits (> 10 m) rest directly on or within a few meters of the buried remains of Pleistocene sediments. These peat deposits began accumulating between 7.3 and 5.8 ka as the rate of sea-level rise slowed. Recent siliciclastic sediments laterally adjacent to these peat deposits are composed of tidally influenced sands, silts, and clays. The seaward one-half of the northeast delta plain, delta front, and prodelta are composed of a seaward-thickening wedge of siliciclastic sediment up to 40 m thick that has accumulated in the last 5 ka. The base of the wedge is marked by a gravel lag that immediately overlies a rooted, yellow-brown alluvial soil. Siliciclastic sediments in this wedge consist of delta-front and prodelta clays and silts, delta-front distributary-mouth sands, and shoreline sands. Young (< 5 ka), reduced-thickness (< 10 m) peat deposits lie conformably on top of this wedge in this part of the delta plain. In contrast, the southwest part of the delta plain is not underlain by shallow-depth Pleistocene sediments, and it started to prograde into the South China Sea prior to 7 ka; its surface is dominated by beach ridges and gley soils mantled by mangrove–Nipa vegetation.

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Contents

SEPM Special Publication

Tropical Deltas of Southeast Asia—Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Petroleum Geology

F. Hasan Sidi
F. Hasan Sidi
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Dag Nummedal
Dag Nummedal
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Patrice Imbert
Patrice Imbert
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Herman Darman
Herman Darman
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Henry W. Posamentier
Henry W. Posamentier
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
76
ISBN electronic:
9781565762138
Publication date:
January 01, 2003

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