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Sediment Dispersal Pattern off an Eroding Delta on the West Coast of Taiwan

By
James T. Liu
James T. Liu
Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 804-24, Republic of China e-mail: james@mail.nsysu.edu.tw
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Ray T. Hsu
Ray T. Hsu
Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 804-24, Republic of China e-mail: james@mail.nsysu.edu.tw
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Jeong-Shang Huang
Jeong-Shang Huang
Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 804-24, Republic of China e-mail: james@mail.nsysu.edu.tw
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Shenn-Yu Chao
Shenn-Yu Chao
Horn Point Environmental Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, Maryland 21613-0775, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 2003

Abstract

The Tseng-wen River is a small monsoon-regulated mountainous river on the wave-dominated west coast of Taiwan. Historical maps reveal a trend of shoreline accretion through delta progradation during the past two and a half centuries until the mid 1970s. Two decades after the completion of a reservoir in the upper reaches of the river in 1974, the depositional setting at the river mouth gradually changed from a progradational deltaic system to an estuarine system. Presently, during the flood season, most of the river-borne sediment is in the mud-size fraction. On the time scale of a tidal cycle, the area of initial river sediment discharge is restricted to the nearshore region in the immediate vicinity of the river mouth. Because of tidal movements in the Taiwan Strait, dispersal patterns of river-borne sediment are dominated by longshore tidal currents that display bilateral swings in the course of a tidal cycle. Yet, on a long-term basis the river discharge is the most important sediment source for the coast and nearshore region. One other important sediment source for the area is the reworked offshore palimpsest sediments. After initial deposition, wave agitation is the most important mechanism affecting sediment entrainment. Several lines of evidence, including grain-size distributions on the sea floor (on the scales of years), measurements of in situ flow and turbidity (on the scale of days), and numerical model simulations of the plume (on the scale of tidal cycles) indicate net northward (flood-oriented) sediment dispersal. The Tseng-wen River represents the type of river that has dwindling influence on the surrounding coast in terms of sediment supply and textural imprint.

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SEPM Special Publication

Tropical Deltas of Southeast Asia—Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Petroleum Geology

F. Hasan Sidi
F. Hasan Sidi
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Dag Nummedal
Dag Nummedal
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Patrice Imbert
Patrice Imbert
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Herman Darman
Herman Darman
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Henry W. Posamentier
Henry W. Posamentier
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
76
ISBN electronic:
9781565762138
Publication date:
January 01, 2003

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