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Book Chapter

Sequence Stratigraphy of a Continental Margin Subjected to Low-Energy and Low-Sediment-Supply Environmental Boundary Conditions: Late Pleistocene–Holocene Deposition Offshore Alabama, U.S.A.

By
Louis R. Bartek
Louis R. Bartek
University of North Carolina, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3315, U.S.A.
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Brian S. Cabote
Brian S. Cabote
ChevronTexaco, Gulf of Mexico Deepwater, SBU, 935 Gravier St., New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, U.S.A.
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Tonja Young
Tonja Young
University of Alabama, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Box 870338, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, U.S.A.
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William Schroeder
William Schroeder
University of Alabama, Marine Science Program, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd., Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528, U.S.A.
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

In 1994, The University of Alabama Seismic Stratigraphy Group collected approximately 2,125 km of high-resolution seismic profiles on the continental shelf offshore Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. This research utilizes these data to characterize the stratigraphy and facies distribution that evolve as sea level fluctuates on a passive continental margin with low storm and wave energy, microtidal range, and low to moderate sediment supply. Emphasis is placed upon determining how changes in the rate of Holocene sea-level rise (fast, slow, punctuated) effect incised-valley fill and deposition. Stochastic models were generated from Q-mode factor analysis, ANOVA, and binomial Markov process analysis to identify quantifiable and statistically significant lateral seismic facies associations and vertical facies successions within a chronostratigraphic framework for the incised valleys and interfluves.

The oxygen isotope Stage 2 lowstand led to bifurcation of the Mobile–Tensaw river system and yielded two distinct incised valleys, an eastern incised valley and a western incised valley, which appear to have formed by headward knickpoint migration. The major incised valleys have geometries and orientations different from the paleo-shoreline, and contain both similar and dissimilar quantifiable seismic facies assemblages, which vary as a result of lateral variations in shelf gradient, sediment supply, and subsidence. Three parasequences and associated flooding surfaces and transgressive retrogradation of depositional systems within the incised valleys are a product of the punctuated relative sea level-rise of the late Pleistocene–Holocene. Presence of a thicker lowstand component and a fluvially dominated lowstand delta at the shelf edge suggests that the western incised valley received the majority of sediment input.

The research presented in this paper shows that the facies architecture of the Mobile incised-valley system has many counterparts throughout geologic history, and supports the validity of using modern or recent systems as analogs to understand the architecture of ancient systems. Given the similarity of the Mobile incised-valley system to ancient systems, it is clear that it is important to quantify facies distribution within the modern system, to develop stochastic models of spatial variability of facies. The stochastic models can be used to assign probability of encountering a particular facies during oil and gas exploration and production or during attempts to remediate contamination in an aquifer of an incised-valley system.

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SEPM Special Publication

Late Quaternary Stratigraphic Evolution of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Margin

John B. Anderson
John B. Anderson
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Richard H. Fillon
Richard H. Fillon
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
79
ISBN electronic:
9781565762152
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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