Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Turbidites After Ten Years of Deep-Sea Drilling–Wringing Out the Mop?

By
Kerry Kelts
Kerry Kelts
Geological Institute, ETH-Z, CH8092 Zurich
Switzerland U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 80225 U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Michael A. Arthur
Michael A. Arthur
Geological Institute, ETH-Z, CH8092 Zurich
Switzerland U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 80225 U.S.A.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1981

Abstract

Deep-sea drilling has provided data on the distribution and changes in composition of redeposited sediment in deep- sea settings through time. The collection of such data by drilling, however, has not been very systematic or purposeful, and has contributed relatively little to the direct understanding of mechanisms of sediment redeposition. A review of reported occurrences of redeposited sediment in DSDP initial reports through Leg 54 shows some temporal patterns: Pleistocene continental margin sequences are thick and dominated by redeposited, relatively coarse-grained terrigenous material, whereas Middle to Upper Eocene and Albian-Cenomanian sequences are characterized by radiolarian turbidites. Moreover, DSDP has recovered an inordinate number of redeposited volcanogenic sequences in the Upper Cretaceous (centered on the Campanian) of all ocean basins and to a lesser extent in the Eocene. These commonly drape the flanks of aseismic rises, ridges, and plateaus and imply episodic volcanism along these features.

Deep Sea Drilling Project cores have also contributed greatly to increasing recognition of the importance of redeposition of large volumes of mud both in fan and non-fan turbidite settings along active and passive margins. Pelagic environments are not devoid of redeposited material; so-called “pelagic turbidites” are common and comprise redeposited pelagic calcareous and siliceous biogenic components derived from the flanks of submarine highs. Redeposited sediments found in DSDP cores have also been extremely important in reconstruction of the tectonic history of numerous features, such as the drowning and demise of Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonate platforms on young passive margins bordering the Atlantic, the destruction and upbuilding of the continental rise along Atlantic margins in the mid-Cenozoic, the history of uplift and volcanism on linear island chains in the Pacific, and the formation and destruction of slope basins along active margins.

With the advent of the Hydraulic Piston Coring system, the future holds promise for more complete documentation of deep-sea fans, a closer examination of controls on timing and frequency of turbidite events, and detailed studies of turbidite physical properties and early diagenesis.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

SEPM Special Publication

The Deep Sea Drilling Project: A Decade of Progress

John E. Warme
John E. Warme
Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado.
Search for other works by this author on:
Robert G. Douglas
Robert G. Douglas
University of Southern California, Los Angeles California
Search for other works by this author on:
Edward L. Winterer
Edward L. Winterer
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla California
Search for other works by this author on:
SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
32
ISBN electronic:
9781565761629
Publication date:
January 01, 1981

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal