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Sedimentology of the Brampton Esker and its Associated Deposits: An Empirical Test of Theory

By
Houston C. Saunderson
Houston C. Saunderson
Department of Geography, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Published:
January 01, 1975

Abstract

The internal grain size and structural properties of the Brampton esker and its associated deposits were grouped into facies and used to test several theories of eskerine sedimentation. Each time-stratigraphic unit consisted of the following proximal to distal sequence of facies: (a) cross-bedded sand and gravel of topset origin, deposited by braided streams, or otherwise during sheetflooding; (b) delta-front sands that are poorly sorted and characterized by massive structure, graded bedding, cut-and-fill structures, irregular lamination, and parallel lamination deposited in the upper flow regime; (c) cross-laminated cosets of fine sands which show stoss-side erosion, stoss-side preservation, and sinusoidal lamination formed by the movement of climbing ripples when the suspended load contributed increasingly to sedimentation; and (d) prodeltaic rhythmites of sand and silt-clay mixtures deposited almost exclusively from suspended load. The delta-front and prodeltaic sediments represent the transition between eskerine gravels and distal rhythmites, both of which are end members of a spectrum of cogenetic deposits.

The facies associations of the Brampton area were separated into: (a) those of the esker proper, and (b) those of the associated deposits adjacent to the esker. The De Geer theory of eskerine sedimentation adequately explains the paleocurrent pattern and facies associations comprising the second group of sediments, but the kind of environment for the esker proper was probably open channel rather than closed conduit. A closed conduit flowing partly full, however, would function in the same way as an open channel.

The sedimentary environment consisted of a braided, topset network of streams that prograded into a glaciolacustrine environment between the walls of a re-entrant within the Ontario ice lobe during late Wis-consinan time.

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Contents

SEPM Special Publication

Glaciofluvial and Glaciolacustrine Sedimentation

Alan V. Jopling
Alan V. Jopling
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;
Barrie C. McDonald
Barrie C. McDonald
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
23
ISBN electronic:
9781565761537
Publication date:
January 01, 1975

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