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Structural History and Reservoir Characteristics (Mississippian) of Nesson Anticline, North Dakota

By
Robert F. Lindsay
Robert F. Lindsay
Chevron U.S.A. Inc. P.O. Box 599 Denver, Colorado 80201
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Lee C. Gerhard
Lee C. Gerhard
Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Ave. Lawrence, Kansas 66046
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Sidney B. Anderson
Sidney B. Anderson
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Julie A. LeFever
Julie A. LeFever
North Dakota Geological Survey University Station Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202
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Richard D. LeFever
Richard D. LeFever
Department of Geology University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202
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Published:
January 01, 1988

Abstract

Nesson anticline is the largest hydrocarbon productive structure in North Dakota portions of the Williston basin. It was discovered in 1951 just a few months after discovery of oil in the Williston basin. Fifty-four fields, producing from fourteen lower to middle Paleozoic formations are scattered along the north-south length of the anticline. Nesson has produced a total of 377 MM80, with the Madison Group accounting for two-thirds of the total production. Central and southern portions of the anticline were subdivided into nine areas, which revealed episodic and independent structural movement since the Late Precambrian.

All Phanerozoic periods are present within the stratigraphic section. Unconformity bound, major tectonic-eustatic sequences were mapped along the length of Nesson, with sedimentary tectonics documented for the entire Phanerozoic. Greatest amounts of tectonic development of the anticline was during the Devonian into early Mississippian. Post-Greenhorn, Laramide tectonism was responsible for the last major structural deformation of the anticline.

Selected oil fields, productive from the Madison Group, were studied where they are productive from Mission Canyon Formation and the Rival ("Nesson") subinterval. These intervals record sediment infill of a slowly shrinking epeiric sea, as a series of shorelines separated by brief transgressions, prograded toward the center of the basin. Mission Canyon Formation can be characterized as a major shallowing upward sequence, which upsection is: 1) shallow open marine, 2) transitional open to restricted marine, 3) restricted marine, and 4) fringing marginal marine. Barrier island/shoreline buildup complexes developed along the shoreline, with bedded evaporites located at a distance away from the anticline toward the east and south. Production is from high energy open marine and barrier island/shoreline buildup limestone facies to the north, and is from interbedded limestones and dolostones deposited in transitional open to restricted and restricted marine facies to the south. After a brief transgressive event deposited the State A marker the Rival ("Nesson") subinterval progradation covered the southern half of Nesson. The Rival ("Nesson") subinterval is subdivided into lower and upper halves. This is due to a subtle transgressive event with the Rival. The lower half was deposited as barrier island/shoreline buildup complexes to the north and as bedded evaporites to the south. The upper half was deposited in an offshore shallow marine setting to the north and center and in a restricted to marginal marine setting to the south. Both shoreline and offshore limestone beds are productive.

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Contents

SEPM Core Workshop Notes

Giant Oil and Gas Fields: A Core Workshop

Anthony J. Lomando
Anthony J. Lomando
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Paul M. Harris
Paul M. Harris
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SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
12
ISBN electronic:
9781565761001
Publication date:
January 01, 1988

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